cadherin

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cad·her·in

(kad-hēr'-in),
One of a class of integral-membrane glycoproteins that has a role in cell-cell adhesion and is important in morphogenesis and differentiation; E-cadherin is also known as uvomorulin and is concentrated in the belt desmosome in epithelial cells; N-cadherin is found in nerve, muscle, and lens cells and helps maintain the integrity of neuronal aggregates; P-cadherin is expressed in placental and epidermal cells. All are calcium-binding proteins.
[cell + adhere + -in]

cadherin

(kăd-hîr′ĭn)
n.
Any of a group of proteins that span the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells and, in the presence of calcium, bind to identical proteins in adjacent cells, thus linking cells together in tissues.

cad·her·in

(kad-hēr'in)
One of a class of integral-membrane glycoproteins that has a role in cell-to-cell adhesion and is important in morphogenesis and differentiation; E-cadherin (also known as uvomorulin) is concentrated in the belt desmosome in epithelial cells; N-cadherin is found in nerve, muscle, and lens cells and helps maintain the integrity of neuronal aggregates; P-cadherin is expressed in placental and epidermal cells.

cadherin

one of a family of GLYCOPROTEINS that are involved in cell to cell attachment for preserving the integrity of all solid tissues. Cadherins have three major regions: the extracellular region that mediates ADHESION (cadherin to cadherin) for cell to cell binding; the transmembrane region; and the cytoplasmic region that extends into the cell and interacts with CATENINS, which in turn are linked to the ACTIN of the CYTOSKELETON. Loss of cadherin binding correlates with the invasion of CANCER.

Cadherins also effect tissue formation by modifying their binding strength to allow cell sorting and migration.