Trichoptera

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Tri·chop·ter·a

(tri-kop'tĕr-ă),
An order of insects in which the aquatic larvae (caddis flies) construct a protective case (caddis) of bits of submerged material in a highly specific form; commonly found attached under stones in freshwater streams. The adult caddis flies, having hairy wings, shed their hairs and epithelia, causing hay fever-like (allergic) symptoms in sensitive people.
[tricho- + G. pteron, wing]

Trichoptera

the insect order containing the caddis flies. The larvae are aquatic and often live in a case or tube which they carry around; they include herbivores and carnivores and some species act as indicators of pollution. The adults have reduced mouthparts and feed only rarely.
References in periodicals archive ?
A synonymy of the caddisfly genus Lepidostoma Rambur (Trichoptera: Lepidostomatidae), including a species checklist.
Stout needs to be rather closely involved in the later stages of the caddisfly life cycle.
Lakes frequented by dippers had steeper littoral zone slopes, more caddisfly larvae, and tended to have more rocky substrate than lakes without dippers (Table 2).
Now, he is hoping to make a synthetic material with similar properties to the caddisfly tape that could be used for applications like sticking wet tissues together during or after an operation while the tissues healed.
Based on published checklists of Tennessee and Kentucky caddisfly fauna and the preliminary data thus far obtained, this poorly surveyed area appears to have a moderately rich trichopteran fauna typical of this region.
Other invertebrates observed in the stomachs included aquatic snails (Gastropoda), terrestrial beetles (Coleoptera), isopods (Isopoda) and caddisfly larvae (Trichoptera).
The sand and silt bottom formation includes mussels (Anodonta grandis and Quadrula undulata), snails (Goniobasis livescens), midge larvae, bryozoans (Plumatella), and occasional caddisfly larvae (Hydropsyche).
Some high alpine invertebrates, such as Glacier National Park's caddisfly, could be lost if water temperatures rise too high or if reduced water availability results in intermittent flow of streams.
April 19 at Caddisfly Resort in Mc-Kenzie Bridge for Todd Summerlin of McKenzie Bridge.
Based on checklists of Tennessee and Kentucky caddisfly fauna and the preliminary data thus far obtained, this poorly surveyed area appears to have a moderately rich trichopteran fauna.