Trichoptera

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Tri·chop·ter·a

(tri-kop'tĕr-ă),
An order of insects in which the aquatic larvae (caddis flies) construct a protective case (caddis) of bits of submerged material in a highly specific form; commonly found attached under stones in freshwater streams. The adult caddis flies, having hairy wings, shed their hairs and epithelia, causing hay fever-like (allergic) symptoms in sensitive people.
[tricho- + G. pteron, wing]

Trichoptera

the insect order containing the caddis flies. The larvae are aquatic and often live in a case or tube which they carry around; they include herbivores and carnivores and some species act as indicators of pollution. The adults have reduced mouthparts and feed only rarely.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dipping specimen flasks into the water and under rocks, the young anglers found snail eggs, diving beetles and caddis flies.
The following morning was cloudless and after breakfast we walked for miles along the lanes listening to the song thrushes and blackbirds and breathing in the green smell of early summer; we sat by a stream where the girls paddled and found caddis flies before going back to the beach where the children played all day with buckets and spades and played rounders with a red plastic bat.
In Japan, tins of insects, from baby bees and silkworm pupae to grasshoppers and zazamushi, the larvae of aquatic caddis flies, sit on supermarket shelves.
Take a pocketful of woolly buggers or caddis flies.
Duncan was unearthing macroinvertebrates: caddis flies and mayflies and stoneflies, snacks for the steelhead in the shallow waters of Whittaker Creek, so she could get a closer look at the bugs and understand one more dimension of the Siuslaw National Forest ecosystem that supports the sensitive fish.
That's enough to buy about 2,000 elk hair caddis flies at your local fly shop.