CT pulmonary angiography


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CT pulmonary angiography

The best contemporary test to assess a patient suspected of having a pulmonary embolism The test uses computed tomographic imaging of the pulmonary arteries to identify blood clots in the right ventricular outflow tracts or the pulmonary arteries. The presence of a clot indicates the need for treatment with anticoagulant drugs. It is used as the generally preferred alternative to invasive pulmonary angiography (which, while accurate, requires right ventricular catheterization), or to ventilation/perfusion scanning of the lungs (which often yields indeterminate results).

CAUTION!

Potential hazards of the test include its radiation exposure, its risk for renal failure (esp. in patients with predisposing conditions for kidney injury), and the risk of allergy to the radiological contrast agent used in the test.
See also: angiography
References in periodicals archive ?
Combined CT pulmonary angiography and CT venography permits comprehensive assessment for pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis, and serves as a road map for therapy, although the reported yield of CT venography has decreased substantially in recent years as CTPA has been increasingly utilized/over-utilized, and CTV is not routinely performed in conjunction with CTPA at most institutions/practices, although there is still evidence to support its use, especially in high-risk patients.
This study was not designed to investigate the incidence of pulmonary emboli in ICU patients, but rather to assess the utility of CT pulmonary angiography.
0 rads per breast is typically delivered during CT pulmonary angiography.
Does addition of CT pelvic venography to CT pulmonary angiography protocols contribute to the diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolic disease?
Studies that compared single-detector spiral CT pulmonary angiography with V/Q scanning showed that CT was a more accurate examination with higher specificity, particularly in those patients with underlying cardiopulmonary disease in whom the vast majority (90% in the PIOPED 1 study) have indeterminate V/Q scan results.
CT pulmonary angiography for the detection of pulmonary embolism: Interobserver agreement between on-call radiology residents and specialists (CTPA interobserver agreement).