CLEC1B

(redirected from CLEC-2)

CLEC1B

A gene on chromosome 12p13.2 that encodes a C-type lectin domain protein which acts as a receptor for the platelet-aggregating snake venom protein rhodocytin. Rhodocytin binding triggers tyrosine phosphorylation, spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) binding, downstream tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of PLC-gamma-2. CLEC1B acts as an attachment factor for HIV-1, facilitating its capture by platelets. It is expressed in the liver, myeloid cells and on platelets.
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In 2000, another set of investigators came across a protein on the surface of platelets and dubbed it C-type lectin-like receptor 2, or CLEC-2.
After six years of research and collaborations with British investigators, the team in 2006 discovered how rhodocytin-a molecule purified from the venom of the Southeast Asia pit viper Calloselasma rhodastoma-binds to the CLEC-2 receptor protein on the platelet surface, spurring the platelet to clot with others like it.
Then, in 2007, the researchers reported how a separate molecule, called podoplanin, binds to the CLEC-2 platelet receptor protein very much like the venom molecule does.
Using a mouse model, the team in 2008 showed that blocking the tumour protein podoplanin from binding with the platelet receptor protein CLEC-2 could prevent tumours from metastasizing to the lung.
The recent investigations hinged on the generation and study of genetically engineered mouse embryos that lacked the platelet receptor protein CLEC-2.
In the end, the experiments showed that CLEC-2 is not only necessary for blood clotting but also necessary for the development of a different type of vessel, specifically lymphatic vessels that carry fluid away from tissues and prevent swelling, or edema.
During fetal development, the CLEC-2 deficiency disturbed the normal process of blood clotting and, in fact, the normal development and differentiation of blood and lymphatic vessels.
These findings suggest that the interaction between CLEC-2 and podoplanin in lymphatic vessels is necessary for the separation between blood vessels and lymphatic vessels," added Hirashima.