CHD


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coronary

 [kor´ah-nar-e]
encircling in the manner of a crown; said of anatomical structures such as vessels, ligaments, or nerves.
coronary arteries two large arteries that branch from the ascending aorta and supply all of the heart muscle with blood (see also table of arteries).
 A view of the coronary arterial system. The arteries serving the posterior aspect of the myocardium are shown here in a lighter shade.
coronary artery disease (CAD) atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries, which may cause angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Both genetically determined and avoidable risk factors contribute to the disease; they include hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and low levels of high density lipoproteins (HDL).
coronary heart disease (CHD) ischemic heart disease.
coronary occlusion the occlusion, or closing off, of a coronary artery, usually caused by a narrowing of the lumen of the blood vessels by the plaques of atherosclerosis. Sometimes a plaque may rupture and release vasoactive or thrombogenic substances that lead to clot formation. If there is adequate collateral circulation to the heart muscle at the time of the occlusion, there may be little or no damage to the myocardial cells. When occlusion is complete, however, with no blood being supplied to an area of the myocardium, myocardial infarction results.

CHD

coronary heart disease.

CHD

abbr.
coronary heart disease

CHD

1 abbreviation for coronary heart disease. See coronary artery disease.

CHD

Abbreviation for:
Centre for Human Development (Medspeak-UK)
centre haemodialysis
Chediak-Higashi disease
childhood disease
Child Health Division
chronic haemodialysis
chronic heart disease
classic Hodgkin disease
congenital diaphragmatic hernia
congenital heart disease
congenital hip dislocation
Connection of Health Data & General Practice (Medspeak-UK)
conventional haemodialysis
coronary heart disease (Medspeak-UK)
cyclohexadiene
cystic hydatid disease

CHD

1. Congenital heart disease.
2. Coronary heart disease.

ChD

Abbrev. for Doctor of Surgery.

CHD,

n.pr See disease, coronary heart.

CHD

canine hip dysplasia.
References in periodicals archive ?
A genetic variant in the region of the GLUL gene was identified that is associated with an increased risk of CHD in type 2 diabetics.
Both new and persistent ECG abnormalities at 4 years were associated with an increased risk of CHD events.
Of note, lipids are much weaker predictors of CHD in older adults than in middle-aged adults; hence, this difference likely reflects the lesser contribution of HDL-C to CHD in the elderly.
While most chromosome defects are not inherited, some anomalies or syndromes with cardiac phenotypes - for instance, those involving microdeletions or gonadal mosaicism - can be inherited and play a small but increasingly appreciated role in CHD.
Bo Yuxin, a 6-year-old girl from Daliang town of Wuqing District, Tianjin city, once suffered from complex CHD with a complete endocardial cushion defect and secondary pulmonary hypertension.
In our study, repeated episodes of depressive symptoms accounted for 10% of all CHD events in the study population.
These findings confirm the results of prior studies showing that urinary ACR is an important biomarker for CHD risk in the general population, even among individuals with ACR values that are less than the current threshold for defining microalbuminuria (30 mg/g)," they noted.
Open garden in the NGS at Aberclwyd Manor, Derwen, Corwen, 11am-4pm - PS3, chd free ?
The next step in elucidating the relationship between blood cholesterol and CHD described in the book was case-control and ecological observational studies performed in the middle of the 20th century.
These actions may be beneficial in preventing vasospasm related CHD in middle-aged and younger women.
According to the CHD, the congressional-style, "Will attempt to accomplish what the Congress has failed to do for forty-five years - seek out the facts surrounding the most important issue of this or any other time.
Researchers then followed them for an average of 14 years to compare the number of heart attacks and CHD deaths between the two groups.