CD69

(redirected from CD69 molecule)

CD69

a type II transmembrane protein present on platelets, CD4-positive or CD8-positive thymocytes, activated lymphocytes, and activated T or natural killer cells that functions as a signal transducer, enhancing cell activation and/or platelet aggregation.

CD69

A gene on chromosome 12p13 that encodes a member of the calcium-dependent lectin superfamily of type-II transmembrane receptors, the expression of which is induced by T-cell activation. CD69 is involved in lymphocyte proliferation and acts as a signal-transmitting receptor in lymphocytes, natural killer (NK) cells and platelets.
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CD69 molecule in human neutrophils: its expression and role in signal-transducing mechanisms.
The CD69 molecule, the earliest marker of T cell activation, is a member of the C-type animal lectin superfamily of signal transmitting receptors and has recently been cloned [9, 10].
As shown in the Table, the proliferation through the CD69 molecule in the presence of submitogenic doses of PMA (2ng/ml) was also decreased in the elderly (16914 vs.
We assessed the expression and functionality of the CD69 molecule, the earliest surface antigen appearing after T cell activation [22].