T helper cell

(redirected from CD4+ T cell)

T helper cell

see helper lymphocyte.
References in classic literature ?
They paddled on up the river, the dusky Indians now and then breaking out into a chant that seemed to give their muscles new energy.
As the immediate effect, however, gradually passed away, a low murmur of voices commenced a sort of chant in honor of the dead.
A wild, pathetic voice, chants a hymn common among the slaves:
The author of that book, too," said the curate, "is a great friend of mine, and his verses from his own mouth are the admiration of all who hear them, for such is the sweetness of his voice that he enchants when he chants them: it gives rather too much of its eclogues, but what is good was never yet plentiful: let it be kept with those that have been set apart.
We ran through a long list of prohibitions, and then the chant swung round to a new formula.
On each side of the choir and behind the gratings opening into the convent was assembled the whole community of the Carmelites, who listened to the divine service, and mingled their chant with the chant of the priests, without seeing the profane, or being seen by them.
Some men are said to wax valorous upon a full stomach, and such seemed to be the case with the Bannack braves, who, in proportion as they crammed themselves with buffalo meat, grew stout of heart, until, the supper at an end, they began to chant war songs, setting forth their mighty deeds, and the victories they had gained over the Blackfeet.
Whether she ran with her tall spars swinging, or breasted it with her tall spars lying over, there was always that wild song, deep like a chant, for a bass to the shrill pipe of the wind played on the sea- tops, with a punctuating crash, now and then, of a breaking wave.
As the shadows of night approached Marheyo's household were once more assembled under his roof: tapers were lit, long curious chants were raised, interminable stories were told (for which one present was little the wiser), and all sorts of social festivities served to while away the time.
Chanting for chanting, my dear Planchet; I have remarked that nations prefer singing a merry chant to the plain chant.
It was the chant of the Carmelite nuns, their only human utterance.
When the chants came on one of her favourites happened to be chosen among the rest--the old double chant "Langdon"--but she did not know what it was called, though she would much have liked to know.