CCR5 coreceptor

CCR5 coreceptor

A cell surface receptor found on macrophages that facilitates entry of HIV-1 into these cells. Chemokines released by T cells attempt to compete with HIV by blocking the receptor to prevent infection.
See also: coreceptor
References in periodicals archive ?
HIV-1 viral particles that use the CCR5 coreceptor to infect the cell are called R5-tropic, those using CXCR4 are called X4-tropic, and those using both are called dual-tropic.
A CCR5 coreceptor antagonist approved for use in combination with other anti-retroviral drugs for treating adults infected with only CCR5-tropic HIV-1 and who have evidence of viral replication and HIV-1 strains resistant to multiple anti-retroviral agents.
Comment: Unlike other classes of oral HIV medications, which attack HIV inside white blood cells, CCR5 antagonists block the CCR5 coreceptor that is on the surface of T cells and is the predominant route of entry for CCR5-tropic HIV-1, according to Pfizer.
s maraviroc, is an antagonist to the CCR5 coreceptor used by HIV to enter CD4-positive T cells.
This drug blocks viral interaction with the CCR5 coreceptor on the cell.
Unlike currently approved therapies, PRO 140 blocks the CCR5 coreceptor, one of the principal portals HIV uses to enter cells.
Trofile is a clinically validated patient selection tropism assay that determines whether a patient is infected with a strain of HIV that uses either the CCR5 coreceptor, the CXCR4 coreceptor, or a combination of CCR5 and CXCR4 to enter cells.
Factors such as the local inflammatory response caused by bacterial vaginosis, urethritis, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) have been associated with upregulation of CCR5 coreceptor expression and increased activation of T lymphocytes in the mucosa of women, thus leading to increased susceptibility.
Initiated a phase 1 clinical trial of a new HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) therapy, PRO 140, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the CCR5 coreceptor that is designed to block infection by inhibiting the ability of the virus to enter healthy cells.
Trofile is a patient selection co-receptor tropism assay that determines whether a patient is infected with a strain of HIV that uses either the CCR5 coreceptor, the CXCR4 coreceptor, or a combination of CCR5 and CXCR4 to enter cells.
Unlike currently approved therapies, PRO 140 blocks the CCR5 coreceptor, one of the principal portals HIV uses to enter cells, that was discovered in 1996 by Progenics' scientists and their collaborators.
The study revealed that among these patients, individuals with viruses that can use the CXCR4 coreceptor have a faster rate of HIV disease progression compared to individuals with viruses that use only the CCR5 coreceptor.