CCNA2

(redirected from CCN1)

CCNA2

A gene on chromosome 4q25-q31 that encodes cyclin A2, which binds and activates CDC2 or CDK2 kinases, thus promoting both cell cycle G1/S and G2/M transitions.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
A1, A2 assessor (D32,33) assessor qualification, desirable but not essential as training will be provided- Experience of working within the gas industry is essential with a detailed knowledge of gas appliances- ACS Assessments: CCN1, CEN1, CKR1, WAT1, CPA1 and HTR1are essential.
The infected tumour cells release a protein called CCN1 into the narrow space between cells where it initiates an antiviral response.
Kaur noted that CCN1 helps regulate cellular functions that include adhesion, migration, and proliferation, and that it is overexpressed in 68 percent of glioblastoma specimens.
Previous research led by Kaur found that oncolytic virus therapy induced the release of CCN1 into the tumour microenvironment.
In the extracellular space, CCN1 reduces viral replication and the killing of glioma cells.
The contract, which begins this month and will run until September 2012, will see trainees carrying out training modules including CCN1 (core safety), CPA1 (combustion performance analyser) and appliance training based on individual requirements.
Plumbing and installation experts working with gas are required by law to re-register every five years for their CCN1 certificate, irrespective of their length of service.
Anyone fitting gas appliances without a CCN1 is breaking the law so to have an assessment centre on the doorstep in Darlington is a real boost to local plumbing businesses.
Jun also discovered that a protein called CCN1 is responsible for turning on the senescent state in fibroblasts.
He was able to show that in mice with a mutated, non-functional form of CCN1, the fibroblasts at the site of a skin wound did not become senescent, and the wound developed excessive scar tissue.
Further, Jun was able to "rescue" the mutated mice by applying CCN1 protein topically to the skin wound, triggering fibroblast senescence and limiting the formation of scar tissue.
The discovery that senescence is a normal wound-healing response in the skin; that senescence in the wound serves an anti-fibrotic function; and that CCN1 is the critical protein that controls this process may prove important in understanding a wide range of pathological conditions related to tissue scarring, said Lau.