CAPRIE


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Clopidogrel vs. Aspirin in Patients at Risk of Ischemic Events. A trial comparing an antiplatelet agent, clopidogrel, to aspirin in decreasing the risk of stroke, infarction, or vascular death in patients with evidence of vascular disease
Conclusion Long-term clopidogrel is more effective than aspirin in decreasing composite end-points for patients with symptomatic ASHD; clopidogrel’s safety is comparable to medium dose aspirin

CAPRIE

Cardiology A clinical trial–Clopidogrel Versus Aspirin in Patients at Risk of Ischemic Events which compared the efficacy of the antiplatelet agent, clopidogrel, with aspirin therapy as a stroke prophylaxis. See Clopidogrel.
References in periodicals archive ?
A subgroup analysis of the CAPRIE study involved 1480 patients with prior cardiac surgery (32).
A multivariate model evaluation of diabetic patients in CAPRIE showed that, compared with aspirin therapy, clopidogrel was independently associated with a decrease in MI, CVA, and vascular death (relative risk, 13.
It is also important to note that on entry into the CAPRIE trial, 80% of the patients were taking aspirin before randomization.
The clinical study, called CAPRIE (Community-Acquired Pneumonia Recovery In the Elderly), is one of only a few studies that have specifically evaluated CAP treatment among elderly (age 65 or older) and very elderly (age 75 or older) patients.
The CAPRIE study findings not only reinforce that AVELOX is an effective and safe treatment option for elderly patients with CAP, but also show that more patients taking AVELOX recovered at days 3 to 5 compared to patients taking LEVAQUIN.
The CAPRIE study was a prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind, double-dummy, comparative study conducted at 47 centers across the United States.
CAPRIE is one of few studies that have evaluated CAP treatment in elderly (65 years or older) and very elderly (75 years or older) patients, even though the elderly are 60 percent more likely to be affected by CAP than the general population.
In the CAPRIE study, hospitalized CAP patients aged 65 years or older were enrolled in a prospective, double-blind trial and randomized to sequential therapy from I.
In the CAPRIE study (Clopidogrel versus Aspirin in Patients at Risk of Ischemic Events), the most common clinically important side effects were pruritus, purpura, diarrhea, and rash; infrequent events included intracranial hemorrhage (0.
Although the CAPRIE study was not powered to detect the individual endpoint of stroke, the results demonstrated that in the subgroup of 6,431 patients who entered the trial with stroke as a qualifying condition, Plavix reduced the risk of stroke by 8% compared with aspirin.