Cyclospora cayetanensis

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Cyclospora cayetanensis

a species causing enteritis with persistent diarrhea; usually acquired by ingestion of contaminated water or food.

Cyclospora cayetanensis

a pathogenic protozoon that causes diarrhea, cramps, and fever in humans. The microorganism, a coccidian parasite about 0.01 mm in diameter, was identified in 1979, after the first known cases of the infection were diagnosed. Before 1996 only three outbreaks of Cyclospora infection had been reported in the United States and Canada. It is diagnosed much more frequently now, and is often referred to as "traveler's diarrhea". Although Cyclospora is transmitted by the fecal-oral route, person-to-person transmission is unlikely because oocytes require days to weeks under favorable conditions to become infectious after leaving an infected host.

Cyclospora cayetanensis

Parasitology A Cryptosporidium-like coccidian protozoan, family Eimeriidae, which is implicated in episodic traveler's diarrhea; it infects the GI tract of immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts–especially with AIDS. See Cyclosporiasis.

Cy·clo·spo·ra ca·ye·ta·nen·sis

(sī'klō-spōr'ă kā-ĕ-tă-nen'sis)
A parasitic species causing enteritis with persistent diarrhea; usually acquired by ingestion of contaminated water or food.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1999, three new distinct Cyclospora species noted for their close similarity with C.
However, these observations leave several unanswered questions about our understanding of the parasite in nonhuman primates; the evolutionary relationship between human C.
Clinical laboratories probably did not identify the organism in many samples that contained it because the procedures to identify C.
Unlike Cryptosporidium, which can be transmitted from one infected human to another via mature oocysts that appear in the stool and are highly infectious, the immature oocysts of C.
We report on a kidney transplant recipient who had uncontrollable diarrhea and weight loss in whom C.
To better understand the prevalence of cyclosporiasis and genetically characterize C.
To our knowledge, this outbreak is the first caused by C.
Our results are consistent with other researchers' inability to establish C.
The finding of an association with avians is consistent with results of a C.
The phylogenetic trees generated by the PUZZLE and PAUP programs displayed similar topologic features and demonstrated that on the basis of the SSU-rRNA the Cyclospora isolates from monkeys are distinct from each other and from C.
First reported in patients in New Guinea in 1977 but thought to be a coccidian parasite of the genus Isospora, C.