C-section

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ce·sar·e·an sec·tion (CS),

(se-zā'rē-ăn),
incision through the abdominal wall and the uterus (abdominal hysterotomy) for extraction of the fetus.

C-section

(sē′sĕk′shən)
n.
A cesarean section.

c-section

C-section

Cesarean section, see there.

Cesarean section; C-section

Incision through the abdominal and uterine walls to deliver the fetus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of note, women with scheduled c-sections and those with chorioamnionitis or another infection requiring postpartum antibiotics were excluded from this study.
Conclusion: In our set up overall C-section rate was 42.
The meta analysis of 17 studies with more than 3,000 women focused on how long women passed gas after a C-section, (http://www.
The head of the state's [eth][yen]ursing Services, Andreas Xenofontos, said the increased number of C-sections has also caused a problem for midwives, who need to have performed at least 40 natural births before they are licenced.
Unsupervised community service doctors with no anaesthetic training were performing on average between two and three C-sections per week in the province's 70 mainly rural district hospitals, conducting spinal blocks with no airway skills, no intubation equipment and insufficient drugs.
More medical complications and anesthetic complications accompany C-section surgery when compared to vaginal delivery, and C-sections carry psychological and economic consequences as well (Menacker & Hamilton, 2010).
But no one there to help so more C-sections, repairs and epidurals.
The majority of births still happen this way, but the advent of C-sections gave doctors an alternative means of delivery where a natural birth would be unsafe.
William Rodney, a professor of family medicine obstetrics at Christian Brothers University in Memphis, said in an interview that the requisite number of C-sections in most states ranges between 50 and 100.
In a report published today in an international scientific journal, academics warn that increasingly popular C-section deliveries heighten the risk of the disorder by 23%.
It also is crucial to recognize that this study is not a strict comparison of whether vaginal delivery is safer than cesarean delivery, but an examination of how C-sections may be linked to subsequent pregnancy complications," Dr.
You can't drive for two weeks after having a C-section There can be some significant rates of chronic pain from the incisions from C-sections," Lauria says.