six phases of consultation

(redirected from Byrne and Long phases of a consultation)

six phases of consultation

A term derived from the 1976 work of Byrne and Long, which studied the framework of consultations with doctors and parsed them into 6 phases, analysing “dysfunctional” consultations in which the patient may be misunderstood and dissatisfied, while the doctor may be frustrated. In the 1976 work they also described a spectrum of consulting styles, from doctor-centred and to patient-centred.

Six phases of a consultation
1. The doctor establishes a relationship with the patient.
2. The doctor discovers or attempts to discover the reason for the attendance.
3. The doctor conducts a verbal and/or physical examination.
4. The doctor, the doctor and patient, or the patient (in that order of probability) consider the condition.
5. The doctor, and occasionally the patient, detail further treatment or investigation.
6. The consultation is terminated, usually by the doctor.