ethics

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ethics

 [eth´iks]
1. a branch of philosophy dealing with values pertaining to human conduct, considering the rightness and wrongness of actions and the goodness or badness of the motives and ends of such actions.
2. systematic rules or principles governing right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession. adj., adj eth´ical.
applied ethics practical ethics.
descriptive ethics a type of nonnormative ethics that simply reports what people believe, how they reason, and how they act.
medical ethics the values and guidelines governing decisions in medical practice.
nonnormative ethics ethics whose objective is to establish what factually or conceptually is the case, not what ethically ought to be the case. Two types are descriptive ethics and metaethics.
normative ethics an approach to ethics that works from standards of right or good action. There are three types of normative theories: virtue theories, deontological theories, and teleological theories.
nursing ethics the values and ethical principles governing nursing practice, conduct, and relationships. The Code for Nurses, adopted by the American Nurses' Association (ANA) in 1950 and revised periodically, is intended to provide definite standards of practice and conduct that are essential to the ethical discharge of the nurse's responsibility. Further information on the Code, interpretative statements that clarify it, and guidance in implementing it in specific situations can be obtained from committees and councils on nursing practice of State Nurses' Associations or from the ANA Nursing Practice Department.
practical ethics the attempt to work out the implications of general theories for specific forms of conduct and moral judgment; formerly called applied ethics.
professional ethics the ethical norms, values, and principles that guide a profession and the ethics of decisions made within the profession.

eth·ics

(eth'iks),
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics

[eth′iks]
Etymology: Gk, ethikos, moral duty
the science or study of moral values or principles, including ideals of autonomy, beneficence, and justice. ethical, adj.

ethics

(1) The study of fundamental principles which define values and determine moral duties and obligations.
 
(2) Moral codes of practice concerned with: behaviour (moral conduct)—e. g. unprofessional behaviour, such as direct discrimination; legal, religious, social and personal concerns (moral issues); and debates within society—e.g. euthanasia vs. prolonging the life of a terminally-ill person.

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
1. The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
2. nursing Philosophy or code about what is ideal in human character and conduct; principles of right or wrong accepted by individual or group; study of morals and moral choices.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics

the principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the health care professional, patients and colleagues

ethics (eˑ·thiks),

n the standards of conduct that direct a group or indi-vidual. In particular, it relates to the appropriate use of the power held by a group or individual.

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong and with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics (eth´iks),

n 1. the science of moral obligation; a system of moral principles, quality, or practice.
n 2. the moral obligation to render to the patient the best possible quality of dental service and to maintain an honest relationship with other members of the profession and mankind in general.
ethics, dental,
n See ethics, professional.
ethics, professional,
n the principles and norms of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of health care professionals themselves and their conduct toward patients and fellow practitioners, including the actions taken in the care of patients and family members.

ethics

rules or principles which govern right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession.

code of ethics
the written rules of ethics.
veterinary ethics
the values and guidelines governing decisions in veterinary practice.

Patient discussion about ethics

Q. The cobbler's shoes are never fixed A bit philosophical/ethical question: do you think it’s a appropriate to an alternative therapist to treat people with disease he or she has and can’t cure himself?

A. Even dietitian can suffer from depression and eat too much, or a gym coach that suffers from injury that prevents him or her from exercising. The knowledge and capabilities are not dependent on the specific situation of the therapist, not to mention the many explanations for such cases.

However, I do agree it may seem a bit suspicious…

More discussions about ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
Legal consultants, industrialists, financiers and economists from the Kingdom and abroad discussed a number of professional topics related to business ethics and anti-fraud and corruption.
Dubai-based Emirates National Oil Company (Enoc) recently held a ceremony to recognise employees who have contributed to its Business Ethics & Compliance (BE&C) activities in 2012.
Alba employees have worked as volunteers in many of inJAz Bahrain's activities, and have been closely involved in the implementation of the Business Ethics Programme across schools in the kingdom.
The effect of age and gender upon students' business ethics was the main concern of Ruegger and King (1992).
The introduction of the Code at ENOC Aviation, ENOC Lubricants and EPPCO International Ltd followed a concerted campaign by the management including direct communication with the staff, distribution of booklets and brochures to educate the staff, a range of Business Ethics & Compliance activities and training sessions.
My own work in the area has focused on the rights and responsibilities of shareholders in business ethics, arguing that they do, indeed, own corporations, that they should actively participate in corporate governance, that investors perceive less financial risk in firms whose managers foster trust, and that the advent of institutional investing should compel researchers to rethink the assumptions underlying both stakeholder and agency theory.
The presentation will give a brief introduction to the topic, definition and importance of business ethics, different types of ethical approaches, and the role of business ethics in global competition.
Given that business ethics remains at a relatively adolescent stage, perhaps it should be considered later in an ethics committee's development.
One is teased with these references and looks forward to the authors' continuing to develop religious resources into further enlightening insights on business ethics.
Multinational companies, Hoffman says, "realized that to have a fully unified business ethics program they couldn't just have it at home; they had to have it in all their operations around the world.
The Business Ethics list manager, Stevens-Knox and Associates, learned of the mailing through employees whose names were planted on the list as decoys--a customary practice to guard against misuse of subscriber addresses.
Angrisani said she's curious about what Judaism has to say about business ethics.

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