Buruli ulcer


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Bu·ru·li ul·cer

an ulcer of the skin, with widespread necrosis of subcutaneous fat, due to infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans; occurs in Uganda in persons living on the Nile river banks.
[Buruli, district in Uganda]

Buruli ulcer

[bo̅o̅′rə·le]
Etymology: Buruli, district in Uganda
an ulcer of the skin with widespread necrosis of subcutaneous fat, caused by a species of Mycobacterium ulcerans, manifested by a small, firm, painless, movable subcutaneous nodule that enlarges and ulcerates. It occurs principally in Central Africa (the Nile river banks), but has also been seen in other tropical areas.
A necrotizing skin ulcer caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, first described in Uganda in 1897. It is characterised by slowly progressive, destructive skin and soft tissue infections
Prevention Cleaning of abrasions sustained outdoors, wearing protective clothing, and avoiding mosquito bites
Diagnosis Polymerase chain reaction testing of ulcer swabs or biopsies
Management Excision, which should include a small rim of healthy tissue; if small, excision may be adequate; more extensive disease may require antibiotics which may allow more conservative surgery

Bu·ru·li ul·cer

(bū-rū'lē ŭl'sĕr)
An infectiousdisease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans characterized by painless swelling that later develops into an ulcerative lesion.
[Buruli, district in Uganda]

Buruli ulcer

A serious skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans . The condition is rare in the Western world but common in humid rural areas in the tropics. There is destruction of subcuticular tissue so that large ulcers with undermined edges form. The organism produces a potent toxin called mycolactone. Antibiotic treatment is effective. Many cases were found in the Buruli district near Lake Kyoga.

Buruli ulcer

a severe tropical ulcer, often of legs and feet, caused by water-borne infection (Mycobacterium ulcerans )
References in periodicals archive ?
Spatio-temporal dynamics and landscape-associated risk of Buruli ulcer in Akonolinga, Cameroon.
Buruli ulcer is becoming more common in some wet areas of West Africa than its better-known mycobacterial cousins, tuberculosis and leprosy.
After seeing the clinical data on the clays effectiveness against Buruli ulcer, Williams established a multicenter, interdisciplinary team of researchers to study the clay.
Johanna Holldack, CEO of Telormedix commented: "We intend this to be the beginning of a fruitful collaboration in order to develop effective vaccines for Malaria and Buruli Ulcer, two serious infectious diseases causing suffering and death in millions of patients worldwide.
Extensive clinical experience has also shown a combination of oral antimicrobial drugs (rifampin with clarithromycin or moxifloxacin) to be effective against Buruli ulcer disease (15).
In six of those locales, cases of Buruli ulcer are widespread; at the others, the disease is absent or nearly so.
Some of these diseases, including Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, and yaws, caused by Treponema pallidum subspecies pertenue, occur only in tropical and subtropical climates.
NTDs designated by the WHO for control or elimination: Buruli ulcer, Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis), cysticercosis/taeniasis, dengue/severe dengue, dracunculiasis (Guinea worm disease), echinococcosis, fascioliasis, human African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, leprosy, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, rabies, schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted helminthiasis, trachoma, and yaws.
In 2006, this partnership was expanded to include leishmaniass, Buruli ulcer, and Chagas disease and renewed for a further 5 years in 2011.
The observation that Buruli ulcer is associated with stagnant or slow-moving water ("Africa's latest scourge," SN: 7/17/99, p.
There are 14 NTDs recognized by United Nations and include leprosy, Guinea worm, Chagas Disease, river blindness and Buruli Ulcer.