burrow

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bur·row

(ber'ō),
1. A subcutaneous tunnel or tract made by a parasite (for example, scabies mite).
2. A sinus or fistula.
3. (Rare) To undermine or create a tunnel or tract through or beneath various tissue planes.

burrow

(bur'ro)
A tunnel made in or under the skin (e.g., by an insect or a parasite).
See: cutaneous larva migrans; scabies
References in periodicals archive ?
The decrease in the diversity not only in Ribeirioida, but also in the whole group of rostroconchs was explained as a competition of this group with the Ordovician bivalves (Pojeta 1979), which are mostly considered similarly to rostroconchs like infaunal burrowers.
Burrowers exert dorsoventral forces against the elastic burrow walls, concentrating stressat the anterior burrow tip, which extends anteriorly by fracture (Dorgan et al.
Because the majority of sturgeon prey items are burrowers in sediment, given their small size, functional feeding morphology, and benthic nature, young sturgeon are probably exploiting the flow boundary layer to access their interstitial prey (Findeis, 1997; Carroll and Wainwright, 2003).
No coincidence, then, that The Burrowers seems like Watership Down for adults, with Chris Packham in the all-seeing role of Fiver and graphics reminiscent of Tony Hart's best bits.
Cryptozoological bloodworms, Dune's sandworms, JT Petty's Burrowers, Alvanson and Negarestani's sentient oil and rat-swarms and machines that are digging: the ground beneath our feet is teeming with chthonic monsters, tellurian presences that chew through earth and nestle in burrows and reach up and snag and snare and pull back down into shifting dirt.
In the current retail real estate environment, there are many opportunities with burrowers having to pay off existing debt, or have notes due, or can't continue to make payments at the current price point.
Primary burrowers are much less studied as compared to secondary and tertiary burrowers.
Centrolenid tadpoles live in well-oxygenated rivers and streams, but they are described as lotic fossorial burrowers that live especially between the wet leaves and mud at the edges of streams (Villa & Valerio 1982, McDiarmid & Altig 1999, Savage 2002, Kubicki 2007).
Furthermore, the presence of lamination points to a lack of active shallow-tier burrowers.
Beleaguered civil servants, meanwhile, have been known to compile "lizard" lists identifying burrowers that have a way of turning up in the hands of the incoming administration.
However, burrowers such as nematodes and some copepods are thought to have entered artificial depressions via crawling or passively through disturbance-induced suspension in the intertidal and in shallow embayments (35, 36).