Burkitt lymphoma


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Related to Burkitt lymphoma: Hodgkin lymphoma, Non Hodgkin Lymphoma

Bur·kitt lym·pho·ma

(bŭr'kĭt), [MIM*113970]
a form of malignant lymphoma reported in African children, frequently involving the jaw and abdominal lymph nodes. Geographic distribution of Burkitt lymphoma suggests that it is found in areas with endemic malaria. It is primarily a B-cell neoplasm and is believed to be caused by Epstein-Barr virus, a member of the family Herpesviridae, which can be isolated from tumor cells in culture; occasional cases of lymphoma with similar features have been reported in the U.S.

Burkitt lymphoma

(bûr′kĭt) or

Burkitt's lymphoma

(-kĭts)
n.
A fast-growing non-Hodgkin lymphoma involving B cells that is characterized by tumors in the jaw, abdomen, or other organs, occurs chiefly in children and in people infected with HIV, and is endemic in equatorial Africa and Papua New Guinea, where it is associated with the Epstein-Barr virus.

Burkitt lymphoma

Oncology An aggressive extranodal B-cell NHL of children and young adults associated with EBV infection and a characteristic translocation between chromosomes 8 and 14. See Lymphoma, Lymphoma belt, WHO classification.

Bur·kitt lym·pho·ma

(bŭr'kit lim-fō'mă)
A form of malignant lymphoma reported in African children, frequently involving the jaw and abdominal lymph nodes. Geographic distribution of Burkitt lymphoma suggests that it is found in areas with endemic malaria. It is primarily a B-cell neoplasm and is believed to be caused by Epstein-Barr virus, a member of the family Herpesviridae, which can be isolated from tumor cells in culture; occasional cases of lymphoma with similar features have been reported in the United States.

Burkitt,

Denis P., English physician in Uganda, 1911-1993.
Burkitt lymphoma - a form of malignant lymphoma reported in African children, caused by Epstein-Barr virus; a member of the family Herpesviridae.
Burkitt tumor

Bur·kitt lym·pho·ma

(bŭr'kit lim-fō'mă) [MIM*113970]
A form of malignant lymphoma reported in African children, frequently involving the jaw and abdominal lymph nodes. Occasional cases of lymphoma with similar features have been reported in the United States.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coverage of the Burkitt Lymphoma pipeline on the basis of route of administration and molecule type.
MYC translocation-negative classical Burkitt lymphoma cases: an alternative pathogenetic mechanism involving miRNA deregulation.
The cytologic examination showed a monotonous population of intermediate-sized lymphoid cells with round to oval nuclei, one or more small nucleoli, and a scant to moderate amount of dark blue cytoplasm containing characteristic peripheral lipid vacuoles, representative of typical Burkitt lymphoma (Figure, C).
These preliminary results suggest that DA-EPOCH-R is highly effective in treating Burkitt lymphoma and at the same time is very well tolerated in all age groups," said Kieron Dunleavy, MD, National Cancer Institute.
B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma.
In the pre-HAART era, Burkitt lymphoma and primary central nervous system B-cell NHL were approximately 1000 times more common in patients with HIV than in the general population.
Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive NHL subtype that is endemic in regions of sub-Saharan Africa.
Germinal centers in 10 reactive lymphoid tissue Mantle/marginal zones in 10 reactive lymphoid tissue Follicular lymphoma 12 Small lymphocytic lymphoma 9 Mantle cell lymphoma 7 Extranodal marginal 5 zone lymphoma Diffuse large 13 B-cell lymphoma Burkitt lymphoma 4 Intensity of 4E-BP1 Expression, No.
Eight (32%) cases were B-cell lymphomas, including 3 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, 2 follicular lymphomas, 1 Burkitt lymphoma, 1 chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, and 1 small B-cell lymphoma, unclassified.
Some authors include cases of anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, and even lymphoblastic lymphoma in their reports, and in some series, authors include cases with higher stage disease, in which it is difficult to prove the process originated in bone.
Besides Burkitt lymphoma, EBV is now suspected as a pathogenic agent in other non-Hodgkin lymphomas (eg, acquired immune deficiency syndrome [AIDS]-associated, posttransplant, and nasal T/natural killer cell), Hodgkin lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma, as well as leiomyosarcoma and leiomyoma associated with immunosuppression.