Bunsen burner

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Bun·sen burn·er

(bŭn'sĕn bern'ĕr),
A gas lamp supplied with lateral openings admitting sufficient air so that the carbon is completely burned, thus giving a very hot but only slightly luminous flame.
[RW Bunsen, 1811-1899]

Bunsen burner

[boo͡n′sən, bun′sən]
Etymology: Robert E.W. Bunsen, German chemist, 1811-1899
a standard laboratory gas burner designed to produce nearly complete combustion in a smokeless flame.

Bunsen burner

A standard laboratory device which is attached to a stream of natural gas (e.g., methane), or a liquefied petroleum gas (e.g., propane and/or butane), which produces an adjustable flame for heating chemical reactions, sterilisation of equipment and combustion.

Bun·sen burn·er

(bŭn'sĕn bŭr'nĕr)
A gas lamp supplied with openings admitting sufficient air that carbon is completely burned, giving a hot but only slightly luminous flame.
[R.W. Bunsen, 1811-1899]

Bunsen,

Robert W., German chemist and physicist, 1811-1899.
Bunsen burner - a gas lamp giving a very hot but only slightly luminous flame.
Bunsen solubility coefficient - the milliliters of gas STPD dissolved per milliliter of liquid and per atmosphere (760 mmHg) partial pressure of the gas at any given temperature.
Bunsen-Roscoe law - in two photochemical reactions, if the product of the intensity of illumination and the time of exposure are equal, the quantities of chemical material undergoing change will be equal. Synonym(s): reciprocity law; Roscoe-Bunsen law
Roscoe-Bunsen law - Synonym(s): Bunsen-Roscoe law