Buck's traction

Buck's traction

Etymology: Gurdon Buck; L, trahere, to pull
one of the most common orthopedic mechanisms by which pull is exerted on the lower extremity with a system of ropes, weights, and pulleys. Buck's traction, which may be unilateral or bilateral, is used to immobilize, position, and align the lower extremity in the treatment of contractures and diseases of the hip and knee. The mechanism commonly consists of a metal bar extending from a frame at the foot of the patient's bed, supporting traction weights connected by a rope passing through a pulley to a cast or a splint around the affected body structure. Compare Bryant's traction.

Buck's traction

Orthopedics An apparatus for applying longitudinal traction on the leg by contact between the skin and adhesive tape, for maintaining the proper alignment of a leg fracture; friction between the tape and skin permits application of force through a cord over a pulley, suspending a weight; elevation of the foot of the bed allows the body to act as a counterweight; a type of traction in which a nonconstricting boot with weights is worn by the Pt to maintain proper alignment. See Traction.