Bacillus thuringiensis

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Ba·cil·lus thu·rin·gi·en·sis

a bacterial species that is an insect pathogen used for vector control that has been implicated in human and mammalian infections. In the laboratory it may be misdiagnosed as a strain of Bacillus cereus.

Bacillus thuringiensis

(Bt) an entomopathogenic BACILLUS species that produces a TOXIN called delta (8) endotoxin, which kills insect larvae. The organism is used as a microbial INSECTICIDE for the BIOLOGICAL CONTROL of various LEPIDOPTERA. Genes for the toxin have been transferred to plants by GENETIC ENGINEERING techniques to make them insect-tolerant. See also BIOPESTICIDE.
References in periodicals archive ?
This may be due to the latter having two Bt toxins inserted for Lepidoptera control (Cry1Ab 5-endotoxin and Vip3Aa20 vegetative insecticide protein), whereas the former has only the Cry1Ab for lepidopteran control.
American farmers are returning to highly lethal chemicals because of widespread overuse and failure of the genetically engineered Bt toxins to control corn rootworm infestations, and glyphosate in controlling weeds.
Monsanto downplayed the findings, saying that Bt toxins are "inoffensive and break down in the digestive tract.
US government agencies consider the Bt proteins produced by genetically modified (GM) crops to be the same as natural Bt toxins.
Compared with typical insecticide sprays, the Bt toxins produced by genetically engineered crops are much safer for people and the environment, explains study leader Yves Carriere, professor of entomology.
The study looked at the prevalence of Bt toxins in female patients, finding that the chemicals -- which are often implanted into GMO crops including corn -- were found in the majority of those who were surveyed.
Completing this project will provide insights into the normal role for this protein and the mode of action of the BT toxins.
Food companies should also respond urgently to new research showing that intact GM Bt toxins have been detected in blood samples taken from women and umbilical cords in Canada.
Also, Bt toxins require specific receptors to act which are absent in us.
They added that crops that are "pyramided" to incorporate two or more Bt toxins are more effective at controlling insect resistance when they are used independently from crops that contain only one Bt toxin.
The insect-killing Bt toxins take their name from Bacillus thuringiensis, the bacterium that makes them.
In 1995, Adang demonstrated a method of designing a synthetic Bt gene suitable for expressing high concentrations of Bt toxins in plants and was awarded a patent for his breakthrough invention.