peptidoglycan

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peptidoglycan

 [pep″tĭ-do-gli´kan]
a glycan (polysaccharide) attached to short cross-linked peptides; found in bacterial cell walls.

pep·ti·do·gly·can

(pep'ti-dō-glī'kan),
A compound containing amino acids (or peptides) linked to sugars, with the latter preponderant. Compare: glycopeptide.
Synonym(s): mucopeptide (2)

peptidoglycan

/pep·ti·do·gly·can/ (pep″tĭ-do-gli´kan) a glycan (polysaccharide) attached to short cross-linked peptides; found in bacterial cell walls.

peptidoglycan

(pĕp′tĭ-dō-glī′kən, -kăn′)
n.
A polymer found in the cell walls of prokaryotes that consists of polysaccharide and peptide chains in a strong molecular network. Also called mucopeptide, murein.

pep·ti·do·gly·can

(pep'ti-dō-glī'kan)
A compound containing amino acids (or peptides) linked to sugars, with the latter preponderant.
Compare: glycopeptide

peptidoglycan

a main component of bacterial CELL WALLS. Peptidoglycan consists of molecules of SUGARS: N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylmuramic acid, linked together in rows (forming the glycan portion of peptidoglycan), and adjacent rows are cross-linked by PEPTIDES (forming the peptide portion of peptidoglycan). Peptidoglycan forms a lattice that surrounds and protects the whole cell. Generally, Gram-positive BACTERIA (see GRAM'S STAIN have many layers of peptidoglycan, forming a thick and rigid layer, while gram-negative bacteria have a thin layer of peptidoglycan.

peptidoglycan

a glycan (polysaccharide) attached to short cross-linked peptides; found in bacterial cell walls and is responsible for their structural rigidity.