Bronze


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Bronze

The title of a function (the others are Gold and Silver) adopted by each of the emergency services (police, fire, ambulance, emergency medical) in the event of major incident (mass disaster) in the UK, which is role, rather than rank, related.

Bronze is used the same way as “operational” in other emergency plans. Bronze controls and deploys the resources of their respective service within a geographical sector or specific role and implements the tactics defined by Silver. As the incident progresses and more resources attend the rendezvous points, the level of supervision increases proportions. As senior managers arrive they will be assigned functions within the Gold, Silver and Bronze structure.
References in classic literature ?
Hector and Ulysses measured the ground, and cast lots from a helmet of bronze to see which should take aim first.
First he greaved his legs with greaves of good make and fitted with ancle-clasps of silver; after this he donned the cuirass of his brother Lycaon, and fitted it to his own body; he hung his silver-studded sword of bronze about his shoulders, and then his mighty shield.
Then it rushed over me that I was being blackmailed for the theft of the bronze piece; and all my merely superstitious fears and doubts were swallowed up in one overpowering, practical question.
Ferguson, and the heart, thrice panoplied in bronze, that could conceive and undertake such an enterprise.
After leaving behind him the civic Tournelle* and the criminal tower, and skirted the great walls of the king's garden, on that unpaved strand where the mud reached to his ankles, he reached the western point of the city, and considered for some time the islet of the Passeur-aux-Vaches, which has disappeared beneath the bronze horse of the Pont Neuf.
The cascades, somewhat rebellious nymphs though they were, poured forth their waters brighter and clearer than crystal: they scattered over the bronze triton and nereids their waves of foam, which glistened like fire in the rays of the sun.
From it he lifted, almost reverently, a small bronze figure,--the figure of a woman, strongly built, almost squat, without grace, whose eyes and head and arms reached upwards.
There are so many ornaments over here, engravings and bronzes which are called Japanese and which are really only imitations.
A pale sun, shining in, touched the golden bronze into smouldering fires that were very pleasing to behold.
75: Celmis, again, and Damnameneus, the first of the Idaean Dactyls, discovered iron in Cyprus; but bronze smelting was discovered by Delas, another Idaean, though Hesiod calls him Scythes (1).
The price of weapons, of gold, of carts and horses, kept rising, but the value of paper money and city articles kept falling, so that by midday there were instances of carters removing valuable goods, such as cloth, and receiving in payment a half of what they carted, while peasant horses were fetching five hundred rubles each, and furniture, mirrors, and bronzes were being given away for nothing.
The artifacts, thought to date to the Middle Bronze Age, were discovered by Phillip Turton on land in Llantrisant Fawr, Monmouthshire.