bronchus

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Related to Bronchial passage: Bronchial tubes, mainstem bronchus

bronchus

 [brong´kus] (pl. bron´chi)
any of the larger passages conveying air to a lung (right or left principal bronchus) and within the lungs (lobar and segmental bronchi). See also respiration and see color plates.

bron·chus

, pl.

bron·chi

(brong'kŭs, brong'kī), [TA]
One of two subdivisions of the trachea serving to convey air to and from the lungs. The trachea divides into right and left main bronchi, which in turn form lobar, segmental, and intrasegmental bronchi. Structurally, the intrapulmonary (secondary) bronchi have a lining of pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium and a lamina propria with abundant longitudinal networks of elastic fibers; there are spirally arranged bundles of smooth muscle, abundant mucoserous glands, and, in the outer part of the wall, irregular plates of hyaline cartilage.
[Mod. L., fr. G. bronchos, windpipe]

bronchus

/bron·chus/ (brong´kus) pl. bron´chi   [L.] one of the larger passages conveying air to a lung (right or left primary bronchus) and within the lungs (lobar and segmental bronchi).
Enlarge picture
Bronchi, showing primary, lobar, and segmental bronchi, which connect to the bronchopulmonary segments (S I–X) of the right and left lungs.

bronchus

(brŏng′kəs)
n. pl. bron·chi (-kī′, -kē′)
Either of two main branches of the trachea, leading directly to the lungs.

bronchus

[brong′kəs] pl. bronchi [-kī]
Etymology: L; Gk, bronchos, windpipe
any one of several large air passages in the lungs through which pass inhaled air and exhaled air. Each bronchus has a wall consisting of three layers. The outermost is made of dense fibrous tissue, reinforced with cartilage. The middle layer is a network of smooth muscle. The innermost layer consists of ciliated mucous membrane. Kinds of bronchi are lobar bronchus (secondary bronchus), primary bronchus, and segmental bronchus (tertiary bronchus). Also called bronchial tube. See also bronchiole. bronchial, adj.

bronchus

Any of the large airways of the lungs, beginning at the tracheal bifurcation, which gives rise to the the right and left mainstem (primary) bronchi; these divide into three lobar (secondary) bronchi in the right lung and two in the left, which then divide into segmental (tertiary) bronchi. The airway divisions after segmental bronchi are termed bronchioles. Bronchi have an outer fibrous layer with irregularly placed plates of hyaline cartilage, an interlacing network of smooth muscle and a mucous membrane lined by ciliated columnar epithelial cells and scattered mucus cells.

bron·chus

, pl. bronchi (brong'kŭs, -kī)
One of the two subdivisions of the trachea serving to convey air to and from the lungs. The trachea divides into right and left main bronchi, which in turn form lobar, segmental, and subsegmental bronchi. The intrapulmonary bronchi have a lining of pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium and a lamina propria with abundant longitudinal networks of elastic fibers; there are spirally arranged bundles of smooth muscle, abundant mucoserous glands, and, in the outer part of the wall, irregular plates of hyaline cartilage.
[Mod. L., fr. G. bronchos, windpipe]
Enlarge picture
BRONCHEAL TREE

bronchus

(brong'kus) (brong'ki?, brong'ke?) plural.bronchi [Gr. bronchos, windpipe]
One of the two large branches of the trachea. The trachea divides opposite the third thoracic vertebra into the right and left main bronchi. The point of division, called the carina trachea, is the site where foreign bodies too large to enter either bronchus would rest after passing through the trachea. The right bronchus is shorter and more vertical than the left one. After entering the lung each bronchus divides further and terminates in bronchioles.

bronchus suis

Tracheal bronchus.

tracheal bronchus

An accessory bronchus that branches off directly from the trachea, the carina, or another bronchus. It is an ectopic malformation of the respiratory tract that usually runs to the right upper lobe of the lung. Synonym: bronchus suis
See: illustration; bronchi

bronchus

A breathing tube. A branch of the windpipe (TRACHEA) or of another bronchus. The trachea divides into two main bronchi, one for each lung, and these, in turn, divide into further, smaller bronchi. See also BRONCHIOLES.

bronchus

one of a pair of tubes (bronchii)

linking the trachea to the lungs in mammals. Each bronchus consists mainly of connective tissue and a small amount of smooth muscle, the tubes becoming finely divided into bronchioles within the lungs, forming a ‘bronchial tree’. See BREATHING and Fig. 81 .

Bronchus

One of the two large tubes connecting the windpipe and the lungs.
Mentioned in: Lung Abscess

bron·chus

, pl. bronchi (brong'kŭs, -kī)
One of two subdivisions of the trachea serving to convey air to and from the lungs.
[Mod. L., fr. G. bronchos, windpipe]

bronchus,

n the subdivisions of the trachea serving to convey air to and from the lungs.

bronchus

pl. bronchi [L.] any of the larger passages conveying air to (right or left principal bronchus) and within the lungs (lobar and segmental bronchi). See also respiration, bronchial.

bronchus clamp
like a bowel clamp but with solid straight blades. Has ratcheted handles.
tracheal bronchus
a lobar bronchus originating directly from the trachea in pigs and cattle, and which aerates the cranial lobe of the right lung.
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