takotsubo cardiomyopathy

(redirected from Broken heart syndrome)
Also found in: Acronyms.
A non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy most common in post-menopausal women, which is characterised by a sudden temporary weakening of the myocardium triggered by physical or emotional stress—e.g., death of a loved one—hence the alternate term, broken heart syndrome
Pathogenesis High serum catecholamines—adrenaline/ epinephrine
Diagnosis Negative coronary angiogram
Prognosis If the individual survives the initial event, the left ventricular function improves within 2 months

takotsubo cardiomyopathy

Reversible dysfunction of the left ventricle. It may be the cause of transient heart failure that occurs after exceptionally stressful events. The heart in such instances takes on a rounded shape with a narrow neck, resembling a traditional Japanese lobster trap (takotsubo). It is informally called broken-heart syndrome.
Synonym: apical ballooning syndrome; stress-induced cardiomyopathy; transient left ventricular apical ballooning
See also: cardiomyopathy
References in periodicals archive ?
02 percent of people get admitted to hospitals in the United States after suffering broken heart syndrome - also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy or takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) - without realizing that what they are experiencing was in fact not a heart attack.
But he warned: "It is difficult to distinguish between broken heart syndrome and a heart attack, so anyone experiencing chest pains or difficulty in breathing should assume the worst and call 999 immediately.
The precise cause of broken heart syndrome is not known, but medical experts believe that surging adrenaline from a stressful event "stuns" the heart, which triggers changes in heart muscle cells or coronary blood vessels, or both, and prevents the left ventricle from effectively pumping blood.
A team of Mayo Clinic researchers has found that patients with broken heart syndrome, also known as apical ballooning syndrome (ABS), have blood vessels that don't react normally to stress.
amp;nbsp;The American Heart Association says that broken heart syndrome is real, and is caused by extreme stress and a surge in hormones as a result that puts stress on the heart.
Stress cardiomyopathy, popularly known as broken heart syndrome, shows symptoms eerily similar to a heart attack, including chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness and fainting.
Dr Alexander Lyon, a senior lecturer at London's Imperial College and consultant cardiologist at the Royal Brompton Hospital, said this may have been a case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, a condition also known as broken heart syndrome when triggered by bereavement.
alled Broken Heart t can also be xpected ch e t Although called Broken Heart Syndrome, it can also be caused by unexpected happiness, such as winning the lottery, and not just grief.
By ISLAMABAD, August 07, 2011 (Balochistan Times): Broken heart syndrome a temporary form of acute heart failure caused by a sudden weakening of the heart muscle may affect more people than previously thought.
Broken heart syndrome is also known as takotsubo cardiomyopathy, stress cardiomyopathy, left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, or ampulla-shaped cardiomyopathy.
Experts believe the symptoms of broken heart syndrome may be brought on by a surge of stress hormones, such as adrenaline.