Brock

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Brock

(brok),
Russell C., 20th-century British surgeon. See: Brock syndrome, Brock operation.
References in periodicals archive ?
But according to the author, Jeremy Brockes of the Middlesex Hospital in London, the case for ddRA's and retinoic acid's morphogenic role during embryonic development remains open.
Confronted by Brockes as to which questions he had found negative, he replied: "All the way through.
Mr Brockes, who will work predominantly on London sites, has more than 30 years experience in mechanical engineering services.
What's more, it's a kind of protein--called a three-finger protein--that is involved in other "striking examples of local evolution," Brockes says.
Handel, who was a renowned self-borrower, extracted nine of the work's 21 arias from his earlier Brockes Passion.
On the proliferation of imitations of Bridget Jones and the burgeoning literature about single thirty-something women, see Bellafante, Bernard, Mendelson, and Brockes.
Brockes of University College London and his colleagues found that a protein called newt anterior gradient (nAG) is essential to the regeneration process.
Breden, "Leibnizens Augustinusrezeption in der Theodicee"; Gunter Frank, "Die Kirchenvater als Apologeten der naturlichen Theologie und Religionsphilosophie in der fruhen Neuzeit"; Scott Mandelbrote, "'Than this nothing can be plainer': Isaac Newton Reads the Fathers"; Jean-Louis Quantin, "Un manuel anti-patristique: Contexte et signification du Traite de l'emploi des saints Peres de Jean Daille (1632)"; Marco Rizzi, "Patristische Exegese und politische Theologie im sechzehnten Jahrhundert: eine Forschungsperspektive"; Mark Vessey, "Vera et Aeterna Monumenta: Jerome's Catalogue of Christian Writers and the Premises of Erasmian Humanism"; and Ralph Hafner, "Grammatologie des Himmels: Barthold Heinrich Brockes und das Testamentum Levi.
Since Seliges Erwagen is apparently modeled on the Brockes Passion, which was first performed in 1717, it would have to date from fairly late in the Frankfurt period; but there is no trace of a Frankfurt performance of Seliges Erwdgen.
Esther I shares a considerable amount of musical material with the so-called Brockes Passion (HWV 48)--nine of the numbers in Esther I use material also found in the passion.
Such an advance could be possible even if scientists never obtain sufficient expertise to regenerate complex structures like limbs, suggests Brockes.