broadside

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broadside

A separately published piece of paper, usually printed on one side and intended to be read unfolded, which is posted, publicly distributed or sold—e.g., proclamations, handbills, newsheets.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the one hand, they reveal separation and distance to be a dominant theme in the broadside ballads that survived in oral tradition, at least in northeastern North America.
This storytype is common in medieval and later broadside ballads of British origin, though in those Old World songs the lovers are separated by clan or by class rather than by ethnicity; even the widely popular Child 200, which in its earlier, pre-1800 British versions might play up the gypsy/Caucasian distinction, in twentieth-century American tradition often makes the lover a gambler ("Black-Jack David") or just a general wanderer rather than an ethnic Other (see Christine A.
The Pepys Ballads, comprising around 1,800 ballads dating mainly from the century before 'Black-Ey'd Susan', include 110 with 'farewell' in the title and 133 marked with the keyword 'maritime' in the English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA); thirteen fall into both categories <ebba.
For example, 'The Nobleman and the Thresherman' was a broadside ballad which had evidently been taken into local oral tradition because it reflected the hardships and aspirations of landless agricultural labourers living in the area.
Simpson's The British Broadside Ballad and its Music (1966), where the interested reader may find a lengthier discussion of some points; for instance, what was the tune of 'The Great Boobee'?
He points to two main factors: the dissolution of the monasteries, which produced a flood of unemployed ex-clerics, too many of whom became itinerant singers; and the invention of the printing press, which made possible the broadside ballad.
This scene, then, equally opens a window onto the representing world of printed prose murder narratives and broadside ballads, relatively established forms which had been developing since at least the 1570s and potential antecedents to the play's dramatic invention.
18) The Bodleian Library's Broadside Ballads Project includes images of five editions of Hood's "Song of the Shirt": Bodl2873 (Manchester, published between 1850 and 1855); Bod8827 (London, between 1863 and 1885); Bod9911 (Preston, between 1840 and 1866); Bod20246 (Bristol, date unknown); and Bod2354 (Durham, between 1797 and 1834).
Damnable Practises: Witches, Dangerous Women, and Music in Seventeenth- Century English Broadside Ballads.
Among specific topics are the 1755 Lisbon earthquake and tsunami in Dutch news sources, news of the Sussex dragon, The Catholick Gamesters and the visual culture of news in Restoration London, news and the neighborhood in early modern domestic murder texts, and the rhetoric of truthfulness in early modern broadside ballads.
A Book of Scattered Leaves: Poetry of Poverty in Broadside Ballads of Nineteenth-Century England.