empiricism

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Related to British empiricism: Continental Rationalism

em·pir·i·cism

(em-pir'i-sizm),
A looking to experience as a guide to practice or to the therapeutic use of any remedy.

empiricism

/em·pir·i·cism/ (em-pir´ĭ-sizm) skill or knowledge based entirely on experience.empir´icempir´ical

empiricism

(ĕm-pîr′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The view that experience, especially of the senses, is the only source of knowledge.
2.
a. Employment of empirical methods, as in science.
b. An empirical conclusion.
3. The practice of medicine that disregards scientific theory and relies solely on practical experience.

em·pir′i·cist n.

empiricism

[empir′isiz′əm]
a form of therapy based on the therapist's personal experience and that of other practitioners. empiricist, n.

empiricism,

n philosophical school in which theories must be based upon repeatable observations. Modern science has empiricism as its philosophical foundation.

empiricism

The belief that knowledge or behaviour stems from experience, learning or data acquired by observation or experimentation. See nativism; empiricist theory.

em·pir·i·cism

(em-pir'i-sizm)
Using experience as a guide to practice or use of any remedy.

empiricism

skill or knowledge based entirely on experience; compare with rationalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aquino does not describe in detail the relation among, on the one hand, Newman's epistemological position, the influence of British empiricism, and his conviction that the existence of the external world and of the self admit of nothing better than probable reasoning and, on the other, his theory of the illative sense.
Norton appears strongly influenced by positivism and British empiricism, presenting the opinions of some authors that might otherwise be viewed as simple professions of faith as cant and bombast.
The book clearly underlines how Deleuze understood the issue of becoming in the framework of British empiricism.
Traditional British empiricism supposed there was a real, mind-independent external world which is discovered but not constructed by the subject.
Three movements are singled out: (1) the rise of irrationalism and individualism as themes of eighteenth-century thought; (2) the influence of British empiricism on aesthetic theory; and (3) the continental aesthetic tradition as represented, for example, by Mendelssohn, Baumgarten, and Tetens.

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