tap

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Related to Bridged tap: Tappan Zee Bridge, VDSL

tap

 [tap]
1. a quick, light blow.
2. to drain off fluid by paracentesis.
spinal tap lumbar puncture.

TAP

(tap),
A protein that transports a peptide from the cytoplasm into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum.

tap

(tap),
1. To withdraw fluid from a cavity by means of a trocar and cannula, hollow needle, or catheter.
2. To strike lightly with the finger or a hammerlike instrument in percussion or to elicit a tendon reflex.
3. A light blow.
4. An East Indian fever of undetermined nature.
5. An instrument to cut threads in a hole in bone before inserting a screw.
[M.E. tappe, fr. A.S. taeppa]

tap

(tap)
1. a quick, light blow.
2. to drain off fluid by paracentesis.

spinal tap  lumbar puncture.

tap

(tăp)
n.
The removal of fluid from a body cavity.
v.
1. To withdraw fluid from a body cavity, as with a trocar and cannula, hollow needle, or catheter.
2. To strike lightly with the finger or a hammerlike instrument, as in percussion or to elicit a tendon reflex.

tap

Etymology: ME, tappen
1 to strike lightly, as in percussion or testing of reflexes.
2 to draw off fluid through a small opening.

TAP

Abbreviation for:
T-cell-activating protein
Thouless-Anderson-Palmer
tocopherol-associated protein
total alkaline phosphatase 
toxicology and applied pharmacology
Trainee Assistant Practitioner 
Training Application Performance 
transluminal angioplasty
transmembrane action potential
transoesophageal atrial pacing
transporter for antigen presenting
transvaginal amniotic puncture
tricuspid angiplasty
trypsinogen activation peptide

tap

noun The fluid obtained when a body cavity is tapped verb To obtain a fluid or liquefied material from a body cavity or tissue by inserting a needle or catheter. See Abdominal tap, Dry tap, Pericardiocentesis.

TAP

A protein that transports a peptide from the cytoplasm into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum.

tap

(tap)
1. To withdraw fluid from a cavity by means of a trocar and cannula, hollow needle, or catheter.
2. To strike lightly with the finger or a hammerlike instrument in percussion or to elicit a tendon reflex.
3. A light blow.
4. An East Indian fever of undetermined nature.
5. An instrument to cut threads in a hole in bone before inserting a screw.
[M.E. tappe, fr. A.S. taeppa]

tap

using a tendon hammer to elicit a tendon reflex

tap

(tap)
1. To withdraw fluid from a cavity by means of a hollow needle or catheter.
2. To strike lightly with the finger in percussion or to elicit a reflex.
[M.E. tappe, fr. A.S. taeppa]

tap

1. a quick, light blow.
2. to drain off fluid by paracentesis.

bone tap
an instrument for cutting a screw thread inside a drill hole in bone. May have a fixed handle or come in bit form so that the bit size can be interchanged in a handle fitted with a chuck.
spinal tap
lumbar puncture.
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