Breslow thickness

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Bres·low thick·ness

(bres'lō),
maximal thickness of a primary cutaneous melanoma measured in tissue sections from the top of the epidermal granular layer, or from the ulcer base (if the tumor is ulcerated), to the bottom of the tumor; metastatic rates correlate closely with tumor thickness.

Breslow thickness

The greatest thickness of a primary cutaneous melanoma, measured in millimeters in a biopsy specimen from the granular layer of the epidermis down to the deepest point of invasion. Thickness is part of the TNM staging of melanoma and is also used as a prognostic factor. In general, the thicker the lesion the worse the prognosis. See cancer staging.

Bres·low thick·ness

(brez'lō thik'nĕs)
Maximal thickness of a primary cutaneous melanoma measured in tissue sections from the top of the epidermal granular layer, or from the ulcer base (if the tumor is ulcerated), to the bottom of the tumor; metastatic rates correlate closely with tumor thickness.

Breslow,

Alexander, U.S. pathologist, 1928-1980.
Breslow thickness - maximal thickness of a primary cutaneous melanoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are limitations for predicting metastasis using the traditional AJCC staging system, based on Breslow's depth (tumor thickness), mitotic rate and ulceration.
Breslow's depth of invasion (measured in hundredths of a millimeter) and Clark's level of invasion into the layers of the dermis (papillary dermis, reticular dermis, and subcutaneous layer) are both important components of the diagnosis, as they guide therapy and yield prognostic information.