selective breeding

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selective breeding

the breeding of animals and plants to embrace desirable characters.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, for 20 farms in the region, breeding bulls have been selected for breeding stock, which will increase the productivity of animals produced in agricultural enterprises and increase the efficiency of production in these agricultural enterprises.
It is entirely possible to create a demand for high-quality breeding stock of any species or breed, but a number of variables come into play with how many new breeders will ultimately be interested in your breeding stock.
Her sale allowed us to promote our Breeding Stock sale on a different basis and attract a significantly better catalogue of mares that we could promote to a global audience," said chief executive Henry Beeby.
Mr Boon said: "Particularly useful at a big sale, this should do much to ensure breeding stock that have long and productive working lives as well as the required genetics.
Hubbard has a longstanding experience in breeding, developing and marketing breeding stock for both conventional and alternative markets.
The zoo's breeding stock comes from young frogs pulled from a San Bernardino Mountains creek to protect them from mudslides and flooding expected to follow 2003 wildfires.
Readers will be surprised to learn earthworms are used not only for recycling but for bait, breeding stock and soil amendments.
Cornell and Darby researched domestic and global markets, knowing there was a demand for velvet antler in Asia, and for breeding stock in the United States.
The lambs will be sold to farmers as breeding stock.
Frank Reese of Lindsborg, KS, has a few birds that came from recently deceased Norm Kardosh's well-known breeding stock.
It can be used to identify and select superior breeding stock for production of progeny with high levels of marbling and relatively low levels of fat trim," Cundiff says.
Cloning is still expensive and as a single twinned animal costs thousands of dollars to produce they will, in the shorter term, be more valued as breeding stock, rather than meat.