selective breeding

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selective breeding

the breeding of animals and plants to embrace desirable characters.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are several potential star lots in the Tattersalls December breeding stock catalogue, including the dams of Maybe, Moonlight Cloud and Treasure Beach, as well as classy racemares Miss Keller and Testosterone, but several potential purchasers yesterday identified a lack of depth beneath the cream of the crop.
Only the movement of stock going from farms for slaughter is permitted, and even breeding stock can only be moved subject to strict veterinary and isolation controls.
Never sell an animal you wouldn't consider buying yourself for breeding stock.
MLC Export Manager Jean-Pierre Garnier said: "Britain has a very high reputation for its breeding stock and genetics.
The database will be an essential resource for farmers looking for organic breeding stock or replacement animals, as required under EU organic livestock regulations and will be of potential value for farms restocking after foot-and-mouth culling.
The thieves left the adult breeding stock, and two weak ducklings, leading staff at to believe they knew what they were looking for.
Her sale allowed us to promote our Breeding Stock sale on a different basis and attract a significantly better catalogue of mares that we could promote to a global audience," said chief executive Henry Beeby.
Mr Boon said: "Particularly useful at a big sale, this should do much to ensure breeding stock that have long and productive working lives as well as the required genetics.
The decline of the Welsh breed meant that Ken had to travel far and wide to purchase quality breeding stock and Barclays were happy to back his bid to expand the herd.
Hubbard, with more than 85 years of experience in selecting the best genetics for the broiler industry, provides solutions that focus on the economic performance, health and well-being of breeding stock.
9 percent of the Canadian pig breeding stock and 3.
Scottish salmon farmer Loch Duart has lost a quarter of its breeding stock following a theft that could have serious ramifications for the company's ability to maintain supply in future.