brassica

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brassica

(brăs′ĭ-kă) [L. “cabbage”]
The family of vegetables that includes broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and cauliflower.

brassica

any member of the family Brassicaceae or Cruciferae, particularly members of the genus Brassica, e.g. cabbage, swede.

Brassica

a genus of plants of the Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) family containing a large number of cultivated plants eaten by humans and food animals. Poisoning with them is rare but under particular growing conditions and if the diet consists almost entirely of the one plant some massive outbreaks of poisoning can occur.
Poisoning syndromes attributed to Brassica spp. include hemolytic anemia (kale anemia) caused by SMCO, goiter from glucosinolates, nitrate/nitrite, photosensitization, blindness (polioencephalomalacia), respiratory distress and rumen stasis.
Includes B. campestris (B. rapa), B. hirta (Sinapis alba), B. juncea (Indian or leaf mustard), B. kaber (Sinapis arvensis), B. napus var. napus (B. napus), B. sinapistrum (Sinapis arvensis).

Brassica alba
annual weed; the seed is used, together with that of B. nigra, to make commercial mustard. The seed, stubble or plant in pod can cause gastroenteritis with signs of abdominal pain, salivation and diarrhea. The toxin is a mixture of isothiocyanates called mustard oil. The enzyme myrosinase is needed to activate the oil and produce irritant effect. Oil cake containing the oil may be nontoxic because myrosinase is inactivated but can become toxic if animal has access to alternative source of the enzyme simultaneously.
Brassica napobrassica
swede turnip.
Brassica napus
rape or canola.
Brassica nigra
seeds are used in mixtures with B. alba in the manufacture of commercial mustard powder. Can cause poisoning as for B. alba (see above).
Brassica oleracea
the commercial vegetables and cultivated fodder plants. Includes B. o. var. acephala (kale, cole, chou moellier), B. o. var. botrytis (cauliflower), B. o. var. capitata (cabbage), B. o. var. gemmifera (Brussel sprouts), B. o. var. italica (broccoli, calabrese).
Brassica rapa
turnip.
Brassica rapa subsp. campestris
turnip rape.
References in periodicals archive ?
With their broad leaves, brassicas shade out the seedbed, prohibiting weed growth and minimizing soil moisture loss through evaporation.
Supplementing the diet with ad-lib fibre, including straw, silage, hay or old grass, to provide the so-called 'scratch factor' in the rumen, will stop the protein in the brassicas from being excreted," he said.
By sequencing Brassica rapa, researchers were able to access half of oilseed rape's genes without having to wrestle with its large and complicated genome.
Genomic DNA was extracted from each Brassica accession, line and/or variety using the modified cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method as reported by [19].
They can determine why larvae eat specific food types, why females lay eggs on these food types, what it is that the butterflies are attracted to, how they detect the stimulus, what plants use these chemicals for, the concept of herbivory and chemical inhibition of herbivory by plants, the niche of cabbage white butterflies (why they lay their eggs on certain plants, why they are not repelled or killed by the plant), and the coevolution of these butterflies and brassicas.
Growers' fears of a difficult year for brassicas are being compounded by uncertainty over their popularity during the summer months, as the unusually warm weather meant they faced fiercer competition among consumers from salad crops.
Beans of all kinds - are of benefit to corn, squash, cucumber, lettuce, spinach, carrots, Brassicas, radish, strawberries and beetroot but do not want the company of sunflowers, alliums, tomatoes, capsicums and aubergines.
Harvest courgettes and green beans on a daily basis or they'll go tough and tasteless and you will stop the next batch developing Remove patches of eggs which cabbage white butterflies have laid on brassicas Damp down the floors and staging in the greenhouse Lift garlic bulbs, bunch loosely and hang in an airy place to dry.
Canola - a member of the brassicas - may be coming to the Willamette Valley.
Root GSL concentrations at the start of flowering were measured at Gundibindyal and GES only and differed between brassicas (Table 4).
You may have heard that a substance found in Brassicas (such as broccoli) protects against cancer.