BrainGate


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BrainGate

A neuroprosthetic device produced by Cyberkinetics, Inc, in 2008 in conjunction with the Department of Neuroscience at Brown University. Braingate is implanted in the motor cortex, allowing a person to move objects such as robotic devices and cursors on a computer screen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other investigational BrainGate research has shown that people with paralysis can control a cursor on a computer screen or a robotic arm.
They cited Intel's prediction that there will be "practical computer-brain interfaces" by 2020 and the current research by the BrainGate team at Brown University.
Saver has been a consultant to BrainGate, Covidien, Grifols, and Stryker and has received research support from Covidien, Lundbeck, and Stryker.
One is from the studies that have been done by BrainGate with people who are quadriplegic but whose brain is intact.
Nine others, including people in the advanced stages of ALS, have undergone similar tests in a closely related study, called BrainGate.
Pasea la mirada por los escaparates: televisores con pantallas de dos metros cuadrados que muestran la misma pelicula documental, hologramas de mujeres o de coches, computadoras sin teclado, pelucas biologicas; un quiosco de prensa ("Hillary Clinton se plantea presentarse a las elecciones democratas", "Manana se clausuran los Juegos Olimpicos de Marraquech", "El Braingate y el eterno problema de los nuevos"); un comercio de articulos de limpieza, una delegacion de loteria, un videoclub, una casa de apuestas, una floristeria, un supermercado de tecnomascotas, una agencia de trabajo temporal.
The brain-machine interface that allowed Hutchinson to direct a robotic arm (right) with her thoughts, called BrainGate, was created by building upon decades of studies.
The ongoing clinical trial, is evaluating the safety and feasibility of an investigational device called the BrainGate neural interface system.
The trial, funded in part by the National Institutes of Health, is evaluating the safety and feasibility of an investigational device called the BrainGate neural interface system.
Doctors see the experimental implant, called BrainGate, as a first step towards devices that can bypass damage to the nervous system, allowing paralysed people to regain control of their limbs.
Other studies focus on the BrainGate, a remarkable technology that shows promise as an upper-limb prosthetic control system and as a means of enabling patients with paralysis to accomplish various tasks--such as controlling a computer cursor--solely through their thoughts.
The BrainGate Neural Interface System, currently in pilot clinical testing, enables a person with quadriplegia to use his/her own brain signals, or thoughts about moving, to control a computer cursor to perform a wide range of self-directed activities, including communication and speech software, telephones, a television or lights, and even a wheelchair.