neuroimaging

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neuroimaging

(no͝or′ō-ĭm′ĭ-jĭng, nyo͝or′-)
n.
Radiological imaging that depicts brain structure or function.

neuroimaging

Imaging
1. Any imaging technique–eg, PET scans, functional MRI, used to evaluate functional aspects of neural activity  .
2. Images obtained from the head which detect any abnormal mass, but which do not identify a specific type of tumor.

neuroimaging

(noor?o-im'a-jing) [ neuro- + imaging]
The visual or graphic representation of the anatomy, blood flow, electrical activity, metabolism, oxygen usage, receptor sites, or other physiological functions of the central nervous system.

volumetric neuroimaging

Volumetric brain imaging.

Neuroimaging

The use of x ray studies and magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) to detect abnormalities or trace pathways of nerve activity in the central nervous system.
Mentioned in: Phobias
References in periodicals archive ?
At present, brain scanning can provide ways for patients to answer yes-or-no questions and may allow them to communicate a set of predetermined, encoded expressions such as "I am in pain" or "I am tired," but there is not yet a way for patients to say anything they want.
In conclusion, the factors typically considered by courts are certainly relevant to auxiliary aid decisions concerning brain scanning.
Though an unknown number of vegetative state patients may be able to communicate through brain scanning, many, if not the majority, are likely unconscious and incapable of any form of communication.
149) If courts were to adopt a less expansive interpretation of the auxiliary aid requirement in the context of brain scanning, they would have to second-guess these decisions.
Communication through brain scanning may not be "effective" compared to communication achievable with individuals suffering from other disabilities.