neuroplasticity

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Related to Brain plasticity: Neuroplasticity

neuroplasticity

(no͝or′ō-plăs-tĭs′ĭ-tē, nyo͝or′-)
n.
The ability of the brain to change in structure or function in response to experience.

neu′ro·plas′tic (-plăs′tĭk) adj.

neuroplasticity

[-plastis′itē]
the capacity of the nervous system for adaptation or regeneration after trauma.

neuroplasticity

(nūr″ō-plăs-tĭs′ĭ-tē)
The ability of the nervous system to adapt to trauma or disease; the ability of nerve cells to grow and form new connections to other neurons.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brainpaths uses Brain Plasticity research findings in its development and patent.
Research has delved into the influence of genetic factors on brain plasticity and recovery after neural injury.
Some of the more obvious players ushering in an end to brain plasticity are structures that literally pin nerve cells in place.
You can also question if microchip designers will ever emulate Brain Plasticity which refers to the changes in brain function, activity and structure in response to experience and learning or the "Flynn Effect" which reflects how general intelligence is progressively increasing with time.
Cattaneo and Vecchi organize their topics around four major themes: Amodal information, sensory compensation and substitution, spatial imagery (not visual imagery), and brain plasticity.
Sophia Vinogradov, disclosed employment and consulting relationships, respectively, with the Brain Plasticity Institute, which has a financial interest in computerized cognitive training programs.
She consulted Paul Bach-y-Rita, a forefront pioneering neuroscientist in brain plasticity.
Hypnosis/meditation increases brain plasticity while using the natural state of the precognitive child to increase brain function and develop brain structure which increases learning and retention of learned material.
Key Words: Metachromatic leukodystrophy, brain plasticity, traumatic brain injury, electrophysiologic studies, rehabilitation, MRI
At the same time, abstract thinking and executive function arise from increased efficiency at the expense of brain plasticity, or the capability of the brain to rewire itself in response to change.
Other subjects are haptic face processing and its relation to vision, large-scale brain plasticity following blindness, and the use of sensory substitution devices.
Second, brain plasticity, which enables changes in brain structure and function due to experience and learning, occurs even in older adults.