neuroplasticity

(redirected from Brain plasticity)
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Related to Brain plasticity: Neuroplasticity

neuroplasticity

(no͝or′ō-plăs-tĭs′ĭ-tē, nyo͝or′-)
n.
The ability of the brain to change in structure or function in response to experience.

neu′ro·plas′tic (-plăs′tĭk) adj.

neuroplasticity

[-plastis′itē]
the capacity of the nervous system for adaptation or regeneration after trauma.

neuroplasticity

(nūr″ō-plăs-tĭs′ĭ-tē)
The ability of the nervous system to adapt to trauma or disease; the ability of nerve cells to grow and form new connections to other neurons.
References in periodicals archive ?
She wondered if giving stroke survivors with motor impairments a virtual avatar that moves properly could help promote brain plasticity (or the ability to change) and recovery.
The good news is that raising brain magnesium levels has been proven to restore critical brain plasticity and improve cognitive function.
Reframe Your Thinking Around Autism: How the Polyvagal Theory and Brain Plasticity Help Us Make Sense of Autism comes from an author who runs a therapeutic consultancy, and outlines a new method of understanding autism.
He is an active researcher and a published author in the field, and his current research interest is in the study of human brain plasticity using MRI.
Dance provides a unique opportunity to investigate brain plasticity and its interaction with behavior.
Authors of an extensive review of strategies for building cognitive reserve and promoting brain plasticity in older adults have hypothesized that learning a new language might be an especially effective way to keep the older brain sharp.
The ability to engage high level cognitive processing while the body is engaged in a cardiovascular workout has set Multisensory Fitness technology apart when it comes to promoting brain plasticity and neurogenesis.
For more about the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory's research on music and learning-associated brain plasticity, visit www.
In a theoretical discussion of brain plasticity after a TBI, Bach-y-Rita noted:
Researchers in neuropsychology, communications disorders, and speech and language therapy explore such topics as the nature of cognitive deficits and psychological function following traumatic brain injury, a theoretical approach to understanding social dysfunction in children and adolescents in traumatic brain injury, higher-level cognitive-communication approaches in chronic traumatic brain injury to harness brain plasticity, evidence-based practice and cognitive rehabilitation therapy, and training communication partners of people with traumatic brain injury.