brain implant

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brain im·plant

(brān im'plant)
Any substance or structure that is placed surgically intracranially.

brain implant

Any substance, tissue, or object placed surgically in the brain.
See also: implant
References in periodicals archive ?
Developing brain implants is crucial to better decipher the neuronal information and intervene in a very thin way on neural networks using microstimulations.
Seidman reported being medical director of the Scientific Advisory Board of Visalus, founder of the Body Language Vitamin, and holder of six patents related to dietary supplements, aircraft, and middle ear and brain implants.
Since the dura mater extends to the brain, it is possible that this technology can help in developing brain implants as well.
Neuroprosthetics devices or neural implants or brain implants offer an efficacious solution to the afore-mentioned type of patients.
Toby Stephens plays Vincent McCarthy, a doctor who is pioneering brain implants for seriously wounded soldiers at the same time that his own daughter Mary (Jade Croot) is ailing.
More on what brain implants can do appears on Page 12.
This glucose fuel cell could be used to drive highly efficient brain implants of the future, which could help paralyzed patients move their arms and legs again.
Deep brain stimulation with a constant-current implant significantly increased "on" time in patients with Parkinson's disease, with an increase of almost 3 hours more than a group of control patients who had inactive brain implants.
Other chapters describe ultra-low-power building-block circuits that are useful in biomedical electronics, followed by chapters that describe the utilization of these circuits in implantable and noninvasive medical systems such as cochlear implants for the deaf, brain implants for the blind and paralyzed, cardiac devices for non-invasive medical monitoring, and biomolecular sensing systems.
It might also provide an improved method of attaching neural prosthetics, such as artificial arms that are controlled by pectoral muscles, or deep brain implants used for treating depression.
Surveys have shown previously that a fair percentage of people would consider getting web-enabled brain implants that would allow them to make phone calls, surf the web and do many other things, all with the power of their brain.
Brain implants have been seen to make a "cyborg" beetle take flight and turn left and right.