Braille

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braille

 [brāl]
an alphabet system for the blind, consisting of raised dots that can be felt with the fingertip.
Braille alphabet based on six-dot system. From Stein et al., 2000.

braille

(brāl),
A system of writing and printing by means of raised dots corresponding to letters, numbers, and punctuation to enable the blind to read by touch.
[Louis Braille, French teacher of blind, 1809-1852]

Braille

[brāl, brä′yə]
Etymology: Louis Braille, French teacher of the blind, 1809-1852
a system of printing for the blind consisting of raised dots or points that can be read by touch.

Braille

Alphanumeric writing designed for the vision impaired; characters are encoded and typed in relief, so properly trained fingers can “read” written communication.

Braille

Public health Alphanumeric writing designed for the vision impaired; characters are encoded and typed in relief so properly trained fingers can “read” written communication. Cf Americans with Disabilities Act, Service dog.

braille

A method of coding information using groups of six raised spots embossed on paper, to enable the blind to read through touch. (Louis Braille, 1809–1852, French school teacher).

Braille,

Louis, French educator, 1809-1852.
Braille - system of raised dots placed in patterns to allow the blind to read.
Braillophone - a combination telephone and braille system.

Braille 

System of printing for blind persons, consisting of points raised above the surface of the paper used as symbols to indicate the letters of the alphabet. Reading is accomplished by touching the points with the fingertips.

Braille (brāl),

n.pr a printing and writing system using elevated dots to represent letters. The system allows those individuals with limited or no visual ability to read via touch.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his second year, Ajay's therapist, who had no previous braille experience, reinforced braille writing several days a week with him and took the initiative to teach him how to write the letters of the alphabet on a brailler that was sent home with him the previous year.
Slates and stylus, the writing frames, and Perkins Braillers are all in heavy demand but in short supply in the country.
The Next Generation Perkins Brailler weighs 25% less than its predecessor, so it's much more portable than the Classic brailler.
Historically, braille literacy skills were taught using a brailler and paper, often reinforced through the teaching of the slate and stylus (Hatlen, 2000).
Other resources included an online brailler developed by the Northeast Regional Center for Vision Education (NRCVE); the Hadley School for the Blind; and websites for specific products, such as Math Window and graphing calculators.
Percentage Response accommodation of states Scribe 96 Typewriter or word processor 82 Use of a brailler to record answers 80 Record answers in test booklet 76 Tape recorder for recording answers 62 Electronic notetaker or personal digital assistant 38 Handwriting guide 8 Table 4 Presentation (n = 30).
For two competencies related to writing passages of more than 150 words in contracted braille on the Perkins brailler, the practitioners identified a higher level of accuracy (0-1 error) than did the instructors (2-3 errors).
Additional responses included not liking the loud noise of the braille writer, using a Perkins brailler, doing too much work, and using numbers.
The Perkins Brailler was initially a toy to be explored and scribbled with.
The method of tapping is similar to that of typing on a Perkins Brailler or a braille notetaker, but it is an entirely tactile method of communication by the fingers on the fingers.
Having studied the services of the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) in Washington and its relationship with the New York Public Library, which provided an extensive range of Braille, audio books, and Perkins Braillers for individuals to use, he compared this with his frustrations as a blind man attempting to use his own local public library in England.