Brahman

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Brahman (bräˑ·mn),

n.pr according to Vedic tradition, the “soul of the Universe,” or the undivided pure consciousness.

Brahman

silver-gray, humped cattle created as a breed in the southern USA from cattle imported from India at the beginning of the 20th century. As a breed they may have had minor infusions of blood from the British breeds.
References in periodicals archive ?
From a Brahmanical perspective, peoples in such castes are Shudras (Sudras).
Relativity here is again underscored by an informed awareness of the tenets of Hinduism for while the Christians, fixing their eyes upon the cross which Hilarion had placed upon her breast, see in Luxima a miraculous savior, the Hindus, observing the Brahmanical mark on her forehead, "beheld the fancied herald of the tenth Avatar, announcing vengeance to the enemies of their religion.
Rocher has argued that Jones's association with the non-Brahman Ramalocana `for a language that was primarily a brahmanical preserve fostered an antibrahmanical stance', but as she points out, after meeting the pandit Radhakanta he was won over to the Bengali Brahmans (`Weaving Knowledge: Sir William Jones and Indian Pandits', in Objects of Enquiry: The Life, Contributions, and Influences of Sir William Jones (1746-1794), ed.
Even those who criticize the hierarchical caste system as "Brahmanical" have failed to protest against the gradual transformation of episcopacy into a Brahmanical system.
Sentiment against the supranational state, which was deemed to be oppressively Brahmanical and anti-south, had run strong in Tamilnadu ever since colonial times (witness Ramaswamy Naicker's call in the early 1940s for a "Dravidadesam" or Dravidian nation).
5) Das (1994:136), for example, notes that Dumont's 'representation is achieved by privileging one worldview - that of the (or to be more accurate, one of the) Brahmanical concepts of tradition and assuming that it can represent Indian society as an "objective totality" of the world.
Through readings, lectures and discussions, students will examine the Brahmanical tradition, the rise of Hinduism and the development of Buddhism.
Dharma, at any rate, does not seem to refer here to Brahmanical dharma specifically or to Dharmasastra.
Consequently, we will need to look at the pre-Buddhist orthodox religion that has its roots in the Vedic and Brahmanical textual tradition.
For instance, Dalit (lower caste) women are not only marginalized and exploited by Brahmanical patriarchs (Chakravarti, 2004) when state interventions are gender-blind (lacking sensitivity), but it is alleged that they are also marginalized by mainstream feminist movements.
The protagonist Satyaraja makes Brahmanical statements when he refers to mala food and clothes on the train journey, which reveal the social rank of the protagonist.
This impulse of the common religion, as opposed to brahmanical canons, provides human rights with cultural embeddedness and local legitimacy.