bradypnea

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bradypnea

 [brad″e-ne´ah]
respirations that are regular in rhythm but slower than normal in rate. This is normal during sleep; otherwise it is associated with disturbance in the brain's respiratory control center, as when the center is affected by opiate narcotics, alcohol, a tumor, a metabolic disorder, or a respiratory decompensation mechanism. See also hypopnea and hypoventilation.

bra·dyp·ne·a

(brad-ip-nē'ă), In the diphthong pn, the p is silent only at the beginning of a word. Although bradypne'a is the correct pronunciation, the alternative pronunciation bradyp'nea is widespread in the U.S.
Abnormal slowness of respiration, specifically a low respiratory frequency.
[brady- + G. pnoē, breathing]

bradypnea

/brady·pnea/ (brad-ip-ne´ah) abnormal slowness of breathing.

bradypnea

[-pnē′ə]
Etymology: Gk, bradys + pnein, to breath
an abnormally low rate of breathing (lower than 12 breaths/min). Compare hypopnea. See also respiration rate.

bradypnoea

Abnormally slow breathing, which is age-dependent:

Age 1 or under: < 30 breaths/minute;
Age 12 or under: < 20 breaths/minute;
Age 12 and over: < 12 breaths/minute.

bra·dyp·ne·a

(brad'ip-nē'ă)
Abnormal slowness of respiration, specifically a low respiratory frequency.
[brady- + G. pnoē, breathing]

bra·dyp·ne·a

(brad'ip-nē'ă) In the diphthong pn, the p is silent only at the beginning of a word. Although bradypne'a is correct pronunciation, alternative pronunciation bradyp'nea is widespread in the U.S.
Abnormal slowness of respiration, specifically a low respiratory frequency.
[brady- + G. pnoē, breathing]

bradypnea (brad´ipnē´ə),

n an abnormal slowness of breathing.
Enlarge picture
Respiration patterns.

bradypnea

respirations that are regular in rhythm but slower than normal in rate. This is normal during sleep; otherwise it is associated with disturbance in the brain's respiratory control center, as when the center is affected by opiate narcotics, a tumor, a metabolic disorder or a respiratory decompensation mechanism.