Bradford's law

(redirected from Bradford's law of scattering)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Bradford's law

A pattern first recognised by SC Bradford in the 1930s that the most significant articles in any given field of investigation are found within a relatively small cluster of journal publications.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bradford's law of scattering was first formulated by Samuel Clement Bradford and coined so by BC Vickery is a bibliometric law.
The Leimkuhler (1967) model is applied to verify Bradford's Law of scattering.
Application of Bradford's Law of Scattering to the Literature of Library & Information Science: A Study of Doctoral Theses Citations Submitted to the Universities of Maharashtra, India
iii)To test the appropriateness of verbal and graphical formulation of Bradford's Law of Scattering.
Bradford's Law of Scattering describes a quantitative relation between journals and the papers published in these.
Therefore, the following method based on the Leimkuhler model was employed for the verification of Bradford's Law of Scattering.
The method developed by Leimkuhler has been utilized in the present study in order to test the application of Bradford's Law of Scattering (Verbal formulation) to the citation data.
To examine the applicability of Bradford's Law of scattering to the pattern of journals used by the researchers in psychology;
The data has been used to test Bradford's Law of scattering and the Bradford's bibliograph for the journal citations in Psychology and its sub-disciplines viz.
Hence, it is established that the journal usage pattern in the discipline of Psychology and its sub-fields does not satisfy the verbal formulation of Bradford's Law of scattering.
For example, if you did a literature search on the topic of library service to the visually handicapped and you found 300 citations, according to Bradford's law of scattering, you did discover that 100 of these citations came from a core group of 5 journals, another 100 citations came from a group of 25 less core journals, and the final 100 citations came from peripheral journals.
The mystery of the transposed journal lists: Wherein Bradford's law of scattering is generalized according to Garfield's law of concentration.
Full browser ?