mesenteric ischemia

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mesenteric ischemia

ischemia in an area of the intestine supplied by a mesenteric artery. Two types are distinguished, occlusive and nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia. It may progress to a mesenteric infarction.
A condition characterised by intermittent severe ischaemia, resulting in abdominal colic, beginning 15–30 mins post-prandially, lasting 1–2 hours, and appearing when 2 or all 3—superior and inferior mesenteric and celiac—major abdominal arteries have severe atherosclerosis; because the intestine’s O2 demand increases with meals, patients avoid the pain by not eating, and thus lose weight; malabsorption may occur since absorption is O2-dependent
Management Bypass, endarterectomy, vascular reimplantation, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

chronic mesenteric ischaemia

A condition characterised by intermittent severe ischaemia resulting in abdominal colic, beginning 15–30 minutes post-prandially and lasting 1-2 hours, which appears when 2 or all 3 of the superior and inferior mesenteric and coeliac major abdominal arteries have severe atherosclerosis. Because the intestine’s O2 demand increases with meals, patients may avoid the pain by not eating, thus losing weight. Malabsorption may occur because absorption is O2-dependent.

Popularly known as abdominal angina, chronic mesenteric ischaemia is preferred by journals that use British English, while chronic intestinal ischemia is used in journals that publish in American English.
 
Management
Bypass, endarterectomy, vascular reimplantation, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty.
References in periodicals archive ?
23) Many dissections are asymptomatic, but when they limit vascular flow they may induce bowel ischemia.
Small bowel ischemia after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass complicated by pregnancy: A case report.
At the time of accident, mesenteric injury had happened which had lead onto mesenteric ischemia and bowel ischemia.
The short segment of decreased enhancement (arrowhead) was consistent with bowel ischemia.
Surgical intervention (such as subtotal colectomy, peritoneal fixation of the colon, hepatopexy) may required in patients with persistent pain, refractory ileus, colonic volvulus or bowel ischemia.
Both groups were compared in terms of patient demographics, presence of co-morbidities, technical success, clinical success, re-bleeding and procedure-related bowel ischemia.
With progressive distension, bowel ischemia ensues leading to gangrene and subsequent perforation.
This type of hernia is associated with high risk of focal bowel ischemia without causing bowel obstruction since contents in the bowel can still pass through the portion of the bowel, which is still within the abdominal cavity.
Treatment is generally directed at limiting progressive venous thrombosis, reducing the risk for bowel necrosis, and performing timely resection in those with irreversible bowel ischemia.