botany

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botany

(bŏt′n-ē)
n. pl. bota·nies
1.
a. The science or study of plants.
b. A book or scholarly work on this subject.
2. The plant life of a particular area: the botany of the Ohio River valley.
3. The characteristic features and biology of a particular kind of plant or plant group.

botany

The formal study of plants.

botany

(bot′ăn-ē, bot′nē) [From L. botanicus, fr Gr. botanikos, pert. to plants, fr botanē, plants, fodder]
The division of biology that studies plants.

botany

the scientific study of plants.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is a treasure trove of unique plants to the botanists, but considered just a wasteland, or a dump by the authorities.
His naming of plants according to his own brand of polynomial nomenclature, often giving plants names after well-known botanists, can be seen as a stage in the development towards a binomial nomenclature.
Evidence supports a growing suspicion among botanists that small cactus species throughout the Sonoran Desert are falling prey to increased insect outbreaks, and drought only weakens the plants' defenses--a sign of climate change in action.
Additionally the botanist who needs to work on ferns from this area will find careful documentation of specimens used in producing this work, a brief botanical history of the area and an extensive bibliography on South Pacific pteridophytes.
I'm sure those who enjoy a tipple of gin will agree it's good news," said zoo botanist Mark Sparrow.
She and a team of botanists discovered that some heirlooms have an extra copy of SUN lurking on chromosome 7.
In 1968, the botanist McGregor reported on a 15-year journey studying wild Echinacea plants from populations throughout its entire geographical range in North America.
Botanists in research posts earn up to pounds 27,400 and senior lecturers in botany at universities may earn up to pounds 40,000 a year.
For nearly 200 years, botanists have debated which plants are most closely related to rafflesias.
A handful of black-and-white photographs and an inset section of color plates illustrate this one-of-a-kind celebration of the pomegranate, written as much for lay readers as for fellow botanists.
As botanists will tell you, a fruit is the edible part of a plant which contains the seeds.
Spokesman Donal O'Sullivan said: "Christopher Leyland and other members of his family were great botanists, so we are very excited about what will be discovered.