Borna disease


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Borna disease

An infectious encephalopathy of warm-blooded animals, including ruminants (e.g., cattle, horses, sheep), foxes, dogs, cats, birds and primates, which occurs in Central Europe, caused by the Borna virus.
 
Clinical findings
Motor and behavioural symptoms—aggression, eating disorders, hyperactivity, postural disorders, ataxia, disrupted social and sexual activity.
 
Epidemiology
Uncertain, probably via saliva or nasal secretions.

Mortality
Up to 100% in horses, 50% in sheep.

Borna disease

a geographically restricted virus disease of horses and occasionally sheep, characterized by a uniformly fatal encephalomyelitis. Clinically it is characterized by pharyngeal paralysis, muscle tremor, lethargy and flaccid paralysis. The causative virus is a non-segmented, negative-stranded RNA virus with a nuclear site of replication and transcription of its genome. It is noncytolytic and highly neurotropic and is the prototype and only member thus far identified of the family Bornaviridae, in the order Mononegavirales. Serologic evidence indicates that the host range of Borna disease virus or an antigenically related virus is wide and the virus has been linked to psychiatric illnesses in humans. Called also Near Eastern equine encephalomyelitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been recognised that Borna disease virus (BDV) could cause neuropsychiatric complications including neurological, behavioural, and mood alterations in animals.
Borna disease virus (BDV) is known primarily as a cause of meningoencephalitis in horses, sheep, and other animals, but infection does occur in humans, usually subclinically; antibodies to the organism are present in 3%-6% of people in various populations.
Distribution of Borna disease virus antigen and RNA in tissues of naturally infected bicoloured white-toothed shrews, Crocidura leucodon, supporting their role as reservoir host species.
27) similarly reported that in mammals with Borna disease, antibodies against ABV do not exhibit protective properties and seem not to play a role in immunopathogenesis.
Borna disease appears as a sporadic infection affecting small numbers of animals each year.
Borna disease virus and its role in neurobehavioral disease.
Conservation of coding potential and terminal sequences in four different isolates of Borna disease virus.
Borna disease virus (BDV) is the causative agent of Borna disease, a meningoencephalitis of horses and sheep in central Europe (1).
Here we report the first unequivocal detection of a BDV reservoir species, the bicolored white-toothed shrew, Crocidura leucodon, in an area in Switzerland with endemic Borna disease.
These included hepatitis E virus, with similar strains causing liver disease in swine and humans; Borna disease virus, causing neurologic disease in various species of animals as well as, debatably, psychiatric disorders in humans; and the recently discovered severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus and its yet-undefined animal reservoir.
For example, a case-control study of Borna disease in cats indicated that hunting mice was a risk factor and that rodents might be virus reservoirs (27).
Rats, tree shrews, and monkeys (mammals like us--some much like us) infected with Borna disease virus behave much like humans with bipolar disorder.