borderline personality disorder

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borderline

 [bor´der-lĭn″]
1. of a phenomenon, straddling the dividing line between two categories.
2. a term used in psychiatry for personality disorders originally viewed as being on the border between psychosis and neurosis. See borderline personality disorder.
borderline personality disorder a personality disorder marked by various features of borderline personality organization, such as instability, impulsiveness, intense or poorly controlled anger, inability to tolerate being alone, and chronic feelings of emptiness. Affected individuals sometimes seem to be on the borderline of psychosis and are highly unstable in mood, behavior, self-image, and affect. None of the features of the condition are constant; behavior is highly unpredictable and such persons seldom achieve their full potential. Their interpersonal relationships are often stormy because of their shifts in attitude and their tendency to idealize, devalue, or manipulate others. Suicidal gestures and self-mutilation sometimes occur with this disorder. The American Psychiatric Association has published Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder, which is printed on their web site at http://www.psych.org.

bor·der·line per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

1. an enduring and pervasive pattern that begins by early adulthood and is characterized by impulsivity and unpredictability, unstable interpersonal relationships, inappropriate or uncontrolled affect, especially anger, identity disturbances, rapid shifts of mood, suicidal acts, self-mutilations, job and marital instability, chronic feelings of emptiness or boredom, and intolerance of being alone.
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when the specified criteria are met.

borderline personality disorder

n. Abbr. BPD
A personality disorder characterized by impulsiveness and by a long-standing pattern of instability in interpersonal relationships, behavior, mood, and self-image, with symptoms often including intense anger and fear of abandonment.

borderline personality disorder

A prolonged disturbance of personality function in a person (usually understood to mean over age 18 years), characterised by unstable moods and unsatisfactory personal relationships, impulsivity, substance abuse, depression, anxiety and fear of abandonment.

Borderline Personality Disorder
1. Frantic efforts to prevent real or imagined abandonment.
2. A pattern of intense and unstable interpersonal relationships swinging between extremes of idealisation and devaluation.
3. Unstable self-image.
4. Impulsivity in 2+ areas and self-destructive potential (e.g., binge eating, driving, gambling, sexual relations, substance abuse).
5. Recurring suicidal or self-mutilating gestures or behaviours.
6. Marked lability of moods and affect.
7. Chronic feeling of “emptiness”.
8. Inappropriate anger and inability to control anger.
9. Transient stress-related paranoid ideation or dissociative symptoms.

borderline personality disorder

Psychiatry A disorder of adult onset, which is characterized by instable interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affect, impulsivity in various contexts, and fluctuations in intense moods
Borderline Personality Disorder
  1. Frantic efforts to prevent real or imagined abandonment
  2. A pattern of intense and unstable interpersonal relationships swinging between extremes of idealization and devaluation
  3. Unstable self-image
  4. Impulsivity in 2+ areas & self-destructive potential, eg binge eating, driving, gambling, sexual relations, substance abuse
  5. Recurring suicidal or self-mutilating gestures or behaviors
  6. Marked lability of moods and affect
  7. Chronic feeling of 'emptiness'
  8. Inappropriate anger and inability to control anger
  9. Transient stress-related paranoid ideation or dissociative symptoms

bor·der·line per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

(bōr'dĕr-līn pĕr-sŏn-al'i-tē dis-ōr'dĕr)
A mental disorder in which the symptoms are not continually psychotic yet are not strictly neurotic: may include impulsivity and unpredictability, unstable interpersonal relationships, inappropriate or uncontrolled anger, identity disturbances, rapid shifts of mood, suicidal acts, self-mutilations, job and marital instability, chronic feelings of emptiness or boredom, and intolerance of being alone.

borderline personality disorder

A psychiatric disorder intermediate between normality and genuine psychiatric illness. A person with a borderline disorder is impulsive, often aggressive, with unexpected swings of emotion from depression to elation and a tendency to regard others as enemies.

Borderline personality disorder (BPD)

A pattern of behavior characterized by impulsive acts, intense but chaotic relationships with others, identity problems, and emotional instability.
Mentioned in: Self-Mutilation
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, diagnostic features of borderline personality disorder include motoric responses (e.
With the exception of borderline personality disorder (and to a lesser degree, avoidant personality disorder), there has been very little research concerning the efficacy of manualized treatments for personality disorders, especially compared to the extensive treatment literature for Axis I disorders.
DBT (Linehan, 1993a, 1993b) is a broad-based cognitive-behavioral approach that is listed as a probably efficacious treatment for borderline personality disorder.
Linehan, Armstrong, Suarez, Allmon, and Heard (1991) compared a group of 22 parasuicidal females with borderline personality disorder who underwent TAU with 22 matched subjects who participated in DBT for one year.
2006) compared TAU to cognitive-behavioral therapy plus TAU in a sample of 106 outpatients with borderline personality disorder.
Borderline personality disorder aside, it is promising to note that the amount of scientifically-sound manualized treatment efficacy studies targeting personality disorder symptoms in the last five years is about equal to all of the sound efficacy studies preceding 2003.
To revisit an earlier example, self-injury associated with borderline personality disorder may serve several functions, such as positively reinforcing effects (e.
Borderline personality disorder is included within Cluster B (erratic-emotional-dramatic) of Axis II personality disorders and is characterized by the DSM-IV-TR (APA, 2000) as "a pervasive pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affects, and marked impulsivity that begins by early adulthood and is present in a variety of contexts" (p.
Among nomothetic assessment techniques that are implicated for borderline personality disorder are devices that establish symptom severity of Axis II disorders in general.
However, regarding the latter point, response topographies in those with borderline personality disorder may also serve a variety of functions (e.
Given the heterogeneity among people diagnosed with borderline personality disorder and the severity of related behaviors (e.
see Farmer, 2000, for a review), and the high rates of comorbidity among individuals who meet criteria for borderline personality disorder in particular (e.

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