breast milk

(redirected from Boob milk)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

breast milk

Etymology: AS, braest + meoluc
human milk conferring some immunities (bronchiolitis and gastroenteritis are rare in breastfed babies). Infants fed breast milk are less likely to become obese, become constipated, and to have dental malocclusion. Compare colostrum. See also breastfeeding.
Human milk is similar to cow’s milk in water content (88%), specific gravity (1.030), fat content (3.5%), energy value (0.67 kcal/ml) and type of sugar-lactose. Breast milk has fewer minerals, certain vitamins (thiamin and riboflavin), and protein (1.0–1.5% vs. 3.3%) than cow’s milk, the latter due to a 6-fold increased in casein; it has more carbohydrates (6.5–7.0% vs. 4.5%), vitamins C and D, and equivalent amounts of vitamins A and B and niacin; it also contains bradykinin, EGF, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, IGF-I, melatonin, mammotropic growth factor, NGF, oxytocin. It is usually sterile, provides IgA, and is more easily digestible, as reflected in rapid transit time; breast-fed infants have a better response to vaccines than formula-fed infants

breast milk

Neonatology Human milk is similar to cow milk in the water content–88%, specific gravity, 1.030, fat content–3.5%, energy value–0.67 kcal/ml and type of sugar—lactose. See Breast-feeding, La Leche League; Cf Certified milk, Humanized milk, Raw milk, White beverages.

breast milk

Milk obtained from the mammary glands of the human breast. It is the ideal source of nutrition for most infants, since it contains maternal antibodies that protect the child from infection, and other substances that promote development of the brain and the gastrointestinal tract, among other organs. Human breast milk that is collected and refrigerated immediately may be used for up to 5 days. If it is collected, frozen, and stored at −17.7°C (0°F), it is safe for 6 months.

CAUTION!

breast-feeding by mothers with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is not recommended, because of the risk of transmission of HIV to the child.
See also: milk