Bonnier syndrome

Bon·nier syn·drome

(bon-nyā),
a syndrome due to a lesion of Deiters nucleus and its connection; the symptoms include ocular disturbances (for example, paralysis of accommodation, nystagmus, diplopia), as well as deafness, nausea, thirst, anorexia, and symptoms referable to the involvement of the vagus centers.

Bonnier syndrome

An obsolete term that formerly dignified the symptoms first attributed to a lesion of the lateral vestibular nucleus and adjacent medulla, now thought to have represented the signs of lateral medullary infarction.
It was described by Pierre Bonnier (1861–1918),  a French physician, and was characterised by vertigo, pallor, tachycardia, somnolence, trigeminal pain, weakness, apprehension and was occasionally accompanied by contralateral hemiplegia.

Bon·nier syn·drome

(bōn-yā' sin'drōm)
A disorder due to a lesion of Deiters nucleus and its connection; the symptoms include ocular disturbances (e.g., paralysis of accommodation, nystagmus, diplopia) as well as deafness, nausea, thirst, anorexia, and symptoms referable to the involvement of the vagus centers.

Bonnier,

Pierre, French clinician, 1861-1918.
Bonnier syndrome - ocular disturbances, deafness, nausea, thirst, and anorexia due to a lesion of the Deiters nucleus.