Bombus


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Related to Bombus: Bombus vosnesenskii

Bombus

(bom′bŭs) [L. bombus, humming]
The genus of stinging insects (family Apidae) that includes the bumblebees.
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Bombus pensylvanicus is currently of some conservation interest given evidence of a significant reduction of range in Illinois (Grixti et al.
After combining their data with information collected by a team of University of Illinois scientists led by entomologist Sydney Cameron, the researchers now have a large database containing information on more than 80,000 Bombus specimens representing 10 species throughout the country, including B.
The study was, in part, an attempt to find out why franklini's range is so restricted and other western bumblebees, such as its close relative Bombus occidentalis, are not.
Orchard Year Family Genera "La 2010 Megachilidae Trachusa Concepcion" Megachile Anthidium Halictidae Augochlorella 2011 Megachilidae Trachusa Heriades Megachile Anthidium Osmia Halictidae Augochlorella Halictus Augochlora Crabronidae Crabro Apidae Xylocopa Bombus Vespidae Parancistrocerus Ancistrocerus Vespula Sphecidae Chlorion Sphex Ammophila Bicyrtes Pompilidae Pepsis Dipogon Scoliidae Triscolia "San Martin" 2010 Halictidae Augochlora Lasioglossum Megachilidae Trachusa Anthidium Crabronidae Crabro 2011 Megachilidae Trachusa Heriades Megachile Anthidium Halictidae Augochlora Vespidae Ancistrocerus Vespula Orchard Species Number of Specimens "La sp.
Scientists believe the tree bumblebee, Bombus hypnorum, could become an important fruit pollinator while posing no threat to native bee populations.
Bombus terrestris bumblebees learned to choose sweet, wired disks more than 80 percent of the time.
Self pollination can occur as pollinators, primarily Bombus spp.
But colonies of Bombus occidentalis used for greenhouse pollination began to suffer from disease problems in the late 1990s and companies stopped rearing them.
Working on multiple floral visitors, Adler and Irwin [26] observed that Xylocopa, Osmia and Habropoda carried the most Gelsemium sempervirens (Carolina jessamine; Loganiaceae) pollen, followed by Bombus and Apis.
which mainly attracted honey bees and Bombus as well as lower frequencies of Xylocopa and leafcutting bees (Megachilidae).