Bolivian hemorrhagic fever


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Related to Bolivian hemorrhagic fever: Machupo virus, Machupo

Bo·liv·i·an hem·or·rhag·ic fe·ver

a disease similar to Argentinian hemorrhagic fever but caused by the Machupo virus, a member of the family Arenaviridae.

Bolivian hemorrhagic fever

[bəliv′ē·ən]
a febrile illness caused by an arenavirus, generally transmitted by contact with or inhalation of aerosolized rodent urine. Person-to-person infection has been documented, but it is very rare. After an incubation period of 1 to 2 weeks, the patient experiences chills, fever, headache, muscle ache, anorexia, nausea, and vomiting. As the disease progresses, hypotension, dehydration, bradycardia, pulmonary edema, and internal hemorrhage may occur. The mortality rate may reach 30%; pulmonary edema is the most common cause of death. There is no specific therapy. Peritoneal dialysis is sometimes performed. Also called Machupo. See also Arenavirus, Argentine hemorrhagic fever, Lassa fever.

Bolivian hemorrhagic fever

Virology An arenavirus infection similar to Argentine HF; BHF is endemic to the grain-producing province of Beni in Amazonian Bolivia Agent Machupo virus Vector Excreted in urine of the rodent vector, Calomys callosus Clinical BHF affects the cardiovascular, hematopoietic, renal systems, and the CNS; early fever, anorexia, N&V, myalgia, neurologic signs—50% have intention tremor, 25% convulsive encephalopathy Mortality 10-20%, especially children. See Machupo virus. Cf Haverhill fever.