Bogalusa Heart Study


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Bogalusa Heart Study

The world’s longest and most detailed prospective study (of 14,000 children), which sought to understand the early natural history of coronary artery disease and essential hypertension.
 
Conclusions
Major causes of adult heart disease (coronary disease) and essential hypertension begin in early childhood and can be identified; environmental factors are significant and influence dyslipidemia, hypertension and obesity; lifestyles and behaviours that influence cardiovascular risk are learned, begin early in life and can be modified in childhood, to reduce cardiovascular risk factors later.

Bogalusa,

a city in Louisiana.
Bogalusa Heart Study - study of children in semirural area of Louisiana, focusing on natural history of coronary artery disease and essential hypertension; largest and longest study of its kind.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Relationship of childhood obesity to coronary heart disease risk factors in adulthood: the Bogalusa Heart Study.
Cardiovascular risk factors and excess adiposity among overweight children and adolescents: The Bogalusa Heart Study.
Relation of body mass index and skinfold thicknesses to cardiovascular disease risk factors in children: the Bogalusa Heart Study.
In the Bogalusa Heart Study, left ventricular mass (by echocardiography) and body composition measures were recorded four years apart in 67 healthy children initially 9-22 years old (Urbina et al.
The relation of overweight to cardiovascular risk factors among children and adolescents: the Bogalusa Heart Study.
Effects of secular trends in obesity on coronary risk factors in children: the Bogalusa Heart Study.
7% of children aged 7-10 years who did not report eating breakfast is very similar to the 13% of 10-year olds who reported not eating any breakfast in the period 1987-88 in the Los Angeles Bogalusa heart study (1) Among NZ children, those who are least likely to eat breakfast are in the 11-14 years age group and this is similar to a Scottish study where breakfast omission was most frequent among young adults, (4) and to the results from a Swedish study (11) and the Australian National Nutrition Survey.
The Bogalusa Heart Study and the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) study reported comparable rates of overweight and obesity (approximately 30%); however, these investigations only reported data collected through 1994 and prevalence rates have likely increased.
To see whether obesity and insulin resistance affect aging at the cellular level, Gerald Berenson of the Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans and his colleagues examined blood samples drawn at least 10 years apart from participants in the ongoing Bogalusa Heart Study.
And in the process, the Bogalusa Heart Study has yielded invaluable insights into risk factors now considered common knowledge.
For three decades, renowned cardiologist Gerald Berenson and his team of researchers have conducted the longest, most detailed study of children in the world; in the process, the Bogalusa Heart Study has provided invaluable insights into the natural history of coronary heart disease and hypertension.
2001), the Bogalusa Heart Study (Berenson 2001), the Avon Longitudinal Study of Pregnancy and Childhood (Golding et al.