modesty

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modesty

propriety of dress, speech, and conduct in relations between patients and health care personnel, including draping and covering of the patient to the greatest extent possible, depending on the type of care or examination.
References in periodicals archive ?
But for men, only body shame, appearance anxiety, and depressed mood were positively correlated with body surveillance.
0) revealed that there were two additional significant paths from body shame to internal awareness and from appearance anxiety to flow.
Body shame was measured using two items from the body shame (BS) subscale of the Objectified Body Consciousness scale (OBC: McKinley & Hyde, 1996).
The BS subscale has been used in studies examining gender and body shame in relation to eating disorder symptomatology and health-related behavior in women and men of diverse ethnicity and age (e.
Table 1 Descriptive Statistics for Independent and Dependent Variables Variables M SD Range Possible Range Body Shame 2.
Body shame was measured as a continuous variable using the body shame subscale of the Objectified Body Consciousness scale (OBC: McKinley & Hyde, 1996).
During class time, participants completed a questionnaire comprised of demographic questions and standardized measures of body shame and eating disorder symptomatology.
There were statistically significant positive relationships between objectification experiences and two of the components of OBC, body surveillance and body shame.
The second regression analysis revealed that objectification experiences and sociocultural attitudes toward appearance explained almost 30% of the variance in body shame ([R.
The OBC scale is composed of three separate but related eight-item subscales: Body Surveillance (viewing the body as an outside observer), Body Shame (feeling shame when the body does not conform to accepted societal standards), and Appearance Control Beliefs (the amount of control a woman believes she has over her appearance).
McKinley and Hyde reported strong correlations between the Body Surveillance subscale and the Body Shame subscale (r = .
Body shame again did not change significantly over time for the control group and was at similar levels to the intervention group posttest.